Feeds

Iron Man to fly Chinese mobe-maker TCL around the world

China taps celebrity power

High performance access to file storage

Little-known Chinese smartphone maker TCL has enlisted a powerful ally to help its nascent push into global markets: Tony Stark, aka Iron Man.

The firm said that its mobile handsets, cloud technology and smart TVs will feature in the forthcoming Iron Man 3, the first co-production between Hollywood and a Chinese studio.

Product placements are nothing new and not often the kind of thing The Reg reports on, but TCL's decision to sign the doubtless-sizeable cheque needed to get on board with the hit franchise is another sign of Chinese mobe-makers' determination to sell beyond their own borders.

TCL's mobile business was kick-started in 2004 with a joint venture with Alcatel and under the latter’s brand it built an established feature phone channel and brand internationally.

According to Gartner’s most recent worldwide mobile phone sales stats for Q3 2012, it currently sits in seventh place with a 2.2 per cent market share, which places it ahead of RIM, Motorola and HTC and not a million miles away from Apple’s 5.5 per cent slice.

In the smartphone space the firm is further down the field, especially in the global market, but analysts believe that could change over the coming year or two as it looks to transition away from feature phones.

“Smartphones still only account for around 20 per cent of TCL-Alcatel’s mobile phone shipment and I expect them to make good inroads into the global smart phone market by leveraging their brand awareness and channel this coming year,” she added.

“They must tackle profitability issue and create a sustainable business model for smart phone, the direction that Huawei has been trying to move towards.”

The firm is also working on a smartphone featuring a web-based Firefox OS platform.

In this context, a little more brand exposure courtesy of Tony Stark may be just the push TCL needs to raise awareness overseas, although it will likely be some time before IT managers have to modify their BYOD policies yet again.

If nothing else, the deal will raise questions about why SHIELD is happy for Iron Man to use Chinese kit when the rest of the US government is so wary of products from Huawei, ZTE and even HP-acquired H3C. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.