Feeds

IT boom driving candidate hungry Honkers

Job opps galore out East, but you may have to do the talking

High performance access to file storage

Ex-pat IT professionals looking to kick start the new year with a new career in a far-flung destination could do worse than Hong Kong or Singapore, where the tech sector is short of job candidates and is snapping up new recruits, according to international agency Hudson.

The recruiter‘s Employment Trends report for Q1 2013 revealed that IT&T is the “shining star” when it comes to hiring expectations in the two nations, according to Hudson’s Hong Kong general manager, Tony Pownell.

In Singapore, the number of respondents in this sector intending to hire more staff leapt 30 per cent to stand at 53 per cent, while in Hong Kong the figure jumped 11 points to 62.5 per cent.

“There’s a real appetite to invest in technology rather than people to improve efficiencies and do things smarter, therefore the market for companies that service these products is improving,” he told The Reg.

Expansion by international software, services and telecoms firms in the region is also driving much of the spike in recruitment, according to Candy Ho, IT consultant at Hudson Hong Kong.

“There’s no substantial expansion by local, Chinese or Taiwanese companies but international firms – especially in business applications and cloud – are having a more positive outlook,” she told The Reg.

“In particular there are a lot of medium sized but international companies stepping into APAC – either Hong Kong or Singapore – who have launched an HQ and are now expanding.”

The spike in roles at international firms doesn’t necessarily mean there will be more jobs for ex-pat IT pros, she cautioned, however they may have a natural advantage in areas like cloud computing, Big Data, CRM and analytics where the market in the UK and Australasia is more mature.

IT job-seekers fresh off the boat won't find everything is easy. Hudson’s Salary & Employment Insights 2013 report, previewed on Tuesday, revealed that large numbers of good candidates are dropping out of the recruitment process, sometimes after signing contracts.

A big part of the problem is lengthy hiring processes, lack of communication and too little transparency on salary and benefits, explained Pownall.

“Employers tend to take a clinical, one-sided approach to recruitment – they spend a long time wooing customers but don’t spend enough time building a psychological contract with the next great hire, so people fall back to negotiating on salary,” he said.

“Employees from other markets need to remember that over here it can feel like things move slower, so they’ll have to drive the process more. And don’t worry if you’ve not heard back for two or three weeks.” ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
From corporate bod to startup star: The 10-month gig that changed everything
What I learned as a techie in my time away from globo firms
Facebook snubbed Google's Silicon Valley wage-strangle pact, Sheryl Sandberg claims
Report details letter COO wrote to court addressing 'no-compete deal' lawsuit
Another day, another nasty Android vuln
Memory corruption mess can brick your mobe
Barclays warns freelance techies of DOUBLE DIGIT rate cut
'IT was a car crash before, so this isn't going to get any better' - sources
VMware announces compulsory bi-ennial VCP recertification
Downside: more time and money; Upside: VMware hints at two-yearly release cycle
Sysadmins and devs: Do these job descriptions make any sense?
Industry lobby group defines skills used in 25 common IT jobs
Who earns '$7k a month' but can't even legally drink? A tech intern!
Glassdoor reveals astonishing salaries of Silicon Valley undergrads
Your CIO is now a venture capitalist and you work at their startup
This just happened without you changing job, by the way
Turnover at the top in Oz telco-land as AAPT, Huawei, Optus, lose top brass
Move along, nothing to see here but orderly transitions
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.