Feeds

Amazon rainforest starts making phone calls

Trees get Gemalto radio tech, can ring the cops

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Trees in Brazil are being fitted with mobile telephones so they can call for help when they're cut down, alerting the authorities to illegal logging as soon as the logs get into range.

The Invisible Tracck is the size of a fag packet, and battery-powered, so it can be hidden in the branches of a tree and automatically activated when the tree is felled. Then it waits for a mobile signal, which it can pick up from 20 miles (32km) away, at which point it calls for help, allowing the authorities to swoop in.

The box uses Gemalto's BGS2 radio module, but was developed by local Brazilian outfit Cargo Tracck, which is more accustomed to tracking trucks and sells a similarly specced device for dropping into the cab, but it has now turned the technology towards tracking trees instead.

“The rainforest in Brazil is approximately the size of the United States," points out the canned quote from Gemalto, which also reminds us that the existing monitoring systems, which use satellite images, are often too late to be useful in tracking down the loggers and proving it was them.

The Invisible Tracck should run for a year or so before needing fresh batteries, and while the forest itself might lack network coverage, the towns which spring up around saw mills generally have enough connectivity to get the message out, and even the threat will make illegal logging more difficult if thieves have to search each tree for bugs.

Trees equipped with mobile telephones also reflect the cheapening of network technologies, and the ease with which inanimate objects are increasingly becoming part of the digital world. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Same old iPad? NO. The new 'soft SIMs' are BIG NEWS
AppleSIM 'ware to allow quick switch of carriers
Brits: Google, can you scrape 60k pages from web, pleeease
Hey, c'mon Choc Factory, it's our 'right to be forgotten'
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.