Feeds

Blighty's schools shake on new 3-year deal with Microsoft

Freeware and new prices to 'save £10m' for UK says DfE

The Power of One Infographic

The Department for Education claims a three-year Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Microsoft will save schools £10m on licensing over the next three years, in part by "factoring freeware" into the deal.

The agreement began 1 January and runs until the end of 2015 giving schools across the UK the option to buy Microsoft academic software at "improved discounts and better licensing terms", said the DfE.

"Schools spend a significant amount on software licensing," said Education Secretary Michael Gove, who didn't say how much nor how the government reached the £10m figure.

"Through this new agreement we can make sure more money goes on front-line teaching," he added.

The licensing framework was set up by Government Procurement Services, which also brokered deals between Microsoft and the Cabinet Office last year.

The spokeswoman at DfE, told us the licensing arrangement was expected to save government £10m over three years but was unable to breakdown those savings, or detail schools spend during that period.

The PR voice box claimed schools will have "more flexibility" in the way they license Microsoft software, and can opt for "more cost effective choices that include "using alternative and free to use software".

Schools can continue to buy new or upgrade Microsoft licences, there is no obligation to buy stuff from the Redmond software giant though, and under the terms of the deal they will not be penalised for using an alternative.

"The MoU enables schools to operate a mixed economy of Microsoft software with other alternative vendor solutions without many of the previous disadvantageous Microsoft licensing consequences," said the DfE. ®

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.