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Apple rubbishes rumours of iPhone for the masses

What are we, Samsung?

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Apple has denied that it is considering increasing its market share and beating off competitors with a cheaper iPhone.

Rumours went around earlier this week that the fruity firm was getting a cheap mobile ready for market, but marketing chief Phil Schiller told a Chinese newspaper that Apple was doing no such thing.

"We are not like other companies, launching multiple products at once and hoping that one of them becomes popular with consumers," Schiller told the Shanghai Evening News (via Google Translate).

The market whispers of an affordable Jesus mobe were started by DigiTimes, but seemed a bit more likely when the Wall Street Journal unearthed some people who had been briefed on the matter who anonymously told the paper that the fruity firm was planning a lower-end iPhone to capture market share.

Schiller's scathing comment was likely aimed at top competitor Samsung, which has an array of smartphones at different prices that have hoovered up a tidy slice of the mobile market. But Schiller said that market share wasn't the thing that most interested Apple, the fruity firm wants to be the smartphone leader. ®

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