Feeds

Kill that Java plugin now! New 0-day exploit running wild online

Over to you, Oracle

Security for virtualized datacentres

A new Java zero-day security vulnerability is already being actively exploited to compromise PCs. The best way to defend against the attacks is to disable any Java browser plugins on your systems.

The offending bug is present in fully patched and up-to-date installations of the Java platform, now overseen by database giant Oracle, according to Jaime Blasco, head of labs at security tools firm AlienVault.

"The exploit is the same as the zero-day vulnerabilities we have been seeing in the past year in IE, Java and Flash," Blasco warned.

"The hacker can virtually own your computer if you visit a malicious link thanks to this new vulnerability. At the moment, there is no patch for this vulnerability, so the only way to protect yourself is by disabling Java."

The exploit targets Java 7 update 10 and prior versions. No fix is available and early indications suggest that exploitation is widespread. Brian Krebs reckons the exploit has found its way into crimeware toolkits, such as the Blackhole Exploit Kit, which will use the hole to infect victims with software nasties.

Java vulnerabilities were abused by the infamous Flashback Trojan, creating the first botnet on Mac OS X machines in the process last year. In the years before that attacks on Java and Adobe applications have eclipsed browser bugs as hackers' favourite way into a system.

In all but a limited number of cases Java support in web browsers is not mandatory for home users, unless required by a banking website or similar, so disabling plugins even as a temporary measure is a good idea. Businesses, on the other hand, that rely on Java for particular applications are not so fortunate.

While waiting for a patch from Oracle to plug the gaping hole, instructions on how to turn off Java in browsers can be found in this blog post by Graham Cluley of Sophos. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for
It's on by default – didn't you read the small print?
Edward who? GCHQ boss dodges Snowden topic during last speech
UK spies would rather 'walk' than do 'mass surveillance'
Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch
Redmond makes a hash of hashing add-on
NOT OK GOOGLE: Android images can conceal code
It's been fixed, but hordes won't have applied the upgrade
Apple grapple: Congress kills FBI's Cupertino crypto kybosh plan
Encryption would lead us all into a 'dark place', claim G-Men
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail
15 months home detention leaves egg on feds' faces as they grab for more power
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.