Feeds

Satnav-murdering Google slips its Maps into car dashboards

If you must have fleshy drivers at least we can tell them where to go

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Hyundai and Kia will be dropping Google Maps into dashboards of their US models, demonstrating the integration next week. The cars will hit the showrooms next year.

Google Maps and Google Places will find space in the 2014 Sorento CUV from Kia while Hyundai will integrate the apps into its Blue Link platform used across the range. Both companies will join Audi and Daimler who are now taking the technology even further by putting Google Street View into the dash.

But it's Google Places which is most important to the search giant, as that enables drivers to ask for a petrol station or coffee shop and be directed to one recommended by the Googleplex, and getting into cars is vitally important in capturing that market.

Such cars need connectivity too, to support cloudy voice recognition as well as streamed maps, but embedded telephony is becoming normal (indeed, legally mandated across the EU by 2015) and car manufacturers are just as keen to become providers of ongoing services (at ongoing cost) as everyone else.

Privacy implications are easily addressed by noting that drivers with a smartphone are already being tracked unless they've jumped through the requisite hoops to switch off such tracking, and even then their network operator still knows their every move unless they pop the battery out, so there aren't really any additional concerns here.

There is a question as to the value of dashboard satnav these days, when the aforementioned smartphone is so capable. Buy a new Land Rover and the dashboard-embedded screen will echo one's smartphone (as long as it's not an iPhone), making car-based satnav redundant.

So the window of opportunity for car manufacturers is shrinking, and it's not surprising to see them upping their offerings to establish themselves before screen-copying enables Google to go straight past them to the driver, until Google can get rid of that driver completely. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.