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Phone-hack saga: Police cuff man in southwest London

Unnamed 46-year-old currently being quizzed at cop shop

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Scotland Yard officers cuffed a 46-year-old man this morning in connection with its investigation into alleged phone-hacking offences at Rupert Murdoch-owned News International.

The unnamed suspect was arrested at his home on Wednesday at an address in southwest London. He was manacled on suspicion of perverting the course of justice, the Met said.

"He has been taken into custody at a south London police station where he remains," they added.

This is the latest in a long line of arrests under Operation Weeting - which is Scotland Yard's high-profile probe of alleged mobile phone voicemail hacks that, it has been claimed, were carried out by employees working on NI's now-folded Sunday redtop News of the World.

In July this year, Prime Minister David Cameron's estwhile spin doctor Andy Coulson - who was NOTW editor from 2003 to 2007 – and one-time NI boss Rebekah Brooks were among a number of suspects who were charged with conspiring to intercept communications without lawful authority as part of that investigation. ®

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