Feeds

The best smartphones for Christmas

So many great handsets, so little time...

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

The Android Nexus

When HTC launched its One X and One S handsets back in the Spring, I, like many others, thought they would give Samsung a run for it’s money. Both are very good devices.

HTC’s physical design and manufacture are second to none: the polycarbonate One X feels and looks much more the part of a flagship blower than the rather too plastic Galaxy S III.

HTC One X

But with Samsung outspending HTC by a massive margin on the advertising front, both One phones have been relegated to the status of also-rans which is a bit of shame. Personally, I'd rather have the One X than the Galaxy S III.

This year finally saw Google get its act together and push the Nexus brand hard by launching not one, not two but three devices running stock, undiluted Android 4.2 Jelly Bean.

The new phone in the Nexus family, the LG-made Nexus 4, is not only a cracking device with a 4.7in, 1280 x 720 screen and a 1.5GHz quad-core CPU but it looks the business: sleek, smart and cool. Though as with any device with a glass front and back you may want to think twice before dropping it.

Google Nexus 4

What really put the Google cat amongst the telco pigeons was the price. The Nexus 4 starts at an impressive £240 for the 8GB model. Of course, without any sort of storage expansion, the £280 16GB device is probably the preferred option. Sadly, Google snarled up the retail release, not pushing out enough phones to meet demand. Two batches of Nexus 4s have been offered, both have sold out in minutes.

This year, Apple finally bit the bullet and admitted that 3.5 inches is regarded by many people as just too small. I’d argue that so is four inches. Her indoors reckons five is the minimum to keep a girl happy, though on reflection we may have been talking at cross purposes.

Either way, the iPhone 5 came as disappointment to me. Granted it’s more powerful than before, the larger screen is undoubtedly state of the art, the UI supremely fluid, the OS idiot proof, and it ensures the iPhone finally works well as a phone, but it feels like Apple is just tweaking things. I want to see some genuinely new features coming from a company that’s sells itself as much as an innovator as Apple does.

Apple iPhone 5 vs 4S

And you really do need to be devout apologist for Apple to excuse the wretched new Maps app. How the Google Maps team must have laughed when they first had a fiddle with it. Make no mistake, it is awful.

After the wholly underwhelming release of Windows Phone 7, its successor, Windows Phone 8, could do no worse. In fact, it did much better, though we need to forget about all the folk stuck with WinPho 7 devices on two-year contracts.

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Same old iPad? NO. The new 'soft SIMs' are BIG NEWS
AppleSIM 'ware to allow quick switch of carriers
Arab States make play for greater government control of the internet
Nerds told to get lost in last-minute power grab bid at UN meeting
Brits: Google, can you scrape 60k pages from web, pleeease
Hey, c'mon Choc Factory, it's our 'right to be forgotten'
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.