Feeds

Microsoft's Steve Ballmer named 'most improved tech CEO'

But there's room for improvement yet

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Jobs and career community website Glassdoor has named Microsoft boss Steve Ballmer its "most improved tech CEO" for 2012, though judging by the numbers it's a dubious honor, to say the least.

According to the site's latest annual Tech Company Comparison Report, which it published on Tuesday, Microsoft's chief exec scored a CEO Approval Rating of 46 per cent in 2012, well below that of nearly every other executive on the list. In fact, only Netflix CEO Reed Hastings and Xerox CEO Ursula Burns scored lower.

So why the hurrahs? It seems Ballmer actually earned an even worse score last year, with a 2011 approval rating of just 29 per cent. That 17-point gain was bigger than that of any other tech exec listed, allowing Redmond's head honcho to walk away with this year's "most improved" award.

Glassdoor didn't venture to speculate on the reason for Ballmer's increased approval rate. It bases its company ratings on reviews posted by employees, who are asked to rate factors like career opportunities, compensation and benefits, work/life balance, and senior management. They're also asked whether they approve of the CEO: thumbs up or down.

It seems likely that Ballmer's increased percentage of up-votes this year can be attributed, at least in part, to Microsoft's renewed multi-device strategy and its aggressive series of product launches, including Windows 8, Windows Phone 8, and Surface.

Steve Ballmer

Give this man a pat on the back

Mind you, the CEOs of some of the other companies listed never even had a shot at the "most improved" category. Google CEO Larry Page's approval rating actually declined, going from 95 per cent in 2011 to a paltry 94 per cent in 2012.

Research in Motion's CEO Approval Rate clocked in at 71 per cent this year, up from a demoralizing 18 per cent in 2011. But RIM cheated; co-CEOs Jim Balsillie and Mike Lazaridis resigned in January under intense pressure from shareholders and the board, making way for Thorsten Heins, whose performance in the top spot has been viewed more favorably.

Meanwhile, although Mark Zuckerberg's CEO approval rating didn't climb as much as Ballmer's, the Facebook founder has something else to act smug about, having won an approval rating of 99 per cent (up from 90 per cent in 2011).

That's no real surprise, given that this year's Glassdoor Employee's Choice Awards named Facebook the best overall company to work for across all industries for the second year in a row, and the top tech employer for the third year in a row. Microsoft didn't make the list. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.