Feeds

In a mobile data eating contest, Brits would win - Ofcom

What's that smeared around your mouth?

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Brits like to splurge more on the internet than any other major country, according to regulator Ofcom.

UK shoppers have broken the £1,000-a-year mark by £83, compared to Aussies, who spend an average of £842 a year and the Swedes, who pay out £747.

In fact, Brits like to shop online so much, they can't even stop themselves when they're out of the house. Over a fifth of UK smartphone users use their mobes to visit retailers online, the highest amount in Europe.

All that lavish online consumption on the move needs plenty of mobile broadband, and UK consumers are also ranked as downloading more data on their phones and fondleslabs than any other big nation. In December 2011, the average British mobile connection used 424MB of data, pushing Japan into second place with 392MB.

The nation might feel better about all that internet frittering because their comms bills aren't too bad, Ofcom said. Comparing baskets of fixed line, mobe calls and texts, fixed and mobile broadband and telly, Blighty is still the cheapest, although the gap is narrowing with France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the US.

Brits also love the idiot box in all its myriad forms. The country leads the global rankings for the adoption of DVRs, and UK telly-watchers are the most likely in the world to watch TV online. Nearly a quarter of the country claim to catch up on their TV watching with services like BBC iPlayer, Sky Go and 4OD every week. Americans are the next most telly-hungry, but 17 per cent watch online every week.

Since they love telly and they love going online, it's no surprise that folks in the UK are embracing high-def and smart TVs. They have the highest proportion of homes with HDTV at 41 per cent, while 15 per cent of people say they own a smart TV.

The average viewer in Blighty watches over four hours of TV every day, 242 minutes. Only two countries watch more telly than that: Italy, at 253 minutes, and the US, at 293 minutes. ®

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
Apple Watch will CONQUER smartwatch world – analysts
After Applelocalypse, other wristputers will get stuck in
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.