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GhostShell hackers release 1.6 million NASA, FBI, ESA accounts

Hacktivist crew signs off for Christmas

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The hacking collecting GhostShell has announced it has finished operations for the year, but has signed off with a dump of around 1.6 million account details purloined from government, military, and industry.

"ProjectWhiteFox will conclude this year's series of attacks by promoting hacktivism worldwide and drawing attention to the freedom of information on the net," the group said in a statement.

"For those two factors we have prepared a juicy release of 1.6 million accounts/records from fields such as aerospace, nanotechnology, banking, law, education, government, military, all kinds of wacky companies & corporations working for the department of defense, airlines and more."

The group claimed the accounts come from the ESA, NASA, Pentagon, Federal Reserve, Interpol, FBI, and firms in the aerospace and military contracting field, as well as some security companies. It also claims to have sent emails highlighting failures in 150 servers to the security chiefs of the hacked organizations.

The team mocked the efforts of law enforcement groups trying to track them down, and the security groups hired to help them. Some of GhostShell's servers had been found, but they were empty, the group said, and of little importance.

However, there were plenty of so-called hidden websites used by online investigators that GhostShell says it has been following and infiltrating. It mocked attempts to hide these sites, saying they would always be watching.

It has been a busy couple of months for the group, which has been cited as an off-shoot of the Anonymous group. In August, around one million account details from businesses were leaked, while in October it released student records from the world's top 100 universities. Last month it was the Russians' turn, with 2.5 million records from government and businesses put online. ®

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