Feeds

GhostShell hackers release 1.6 million NASA, FBI, ESA accounts

Hacktivist crew signs off for Christmas

The essential guide to IT transformation

The hacking collecting GhostShell has announced it has finished operations for the year, but has signed off with a dump of around 1.6 million account details purloined from government, military, and industry.

"ProjectWhiteFox will conclude this year's series of attacks by promoting hacktivism worldwide and drawing attention to the freedom of information on the net," the group said in a statement.

"For those two factors we have prepared a juicy release of 1.6 million accounts/records from fields such as aerospace, nanotechnology, banking, law, education, government, military, all kinds of wacky companies & corporations working for the department of defense, airlines and more."

The group claimed the accounts come from the ESA, NASA, Pentagon, Federal Reserve, Interpol, FBI, and firms in the aerospace and military contracting field, as well as some security companies. It also claims to have sent emails highlighting failures in 150 servers to the security chiefs of the hacked organizations.

The team mocked the efforts of law enforcement groups trying to track them down, and the security groups hired to help them. Some of GhostShell's servers had been found, but they were empty, the group said, and of little importance.

However, there were plenty of so-called hidden websites used by online investigators that GhostShell says it has been following and infiltrating. It mocked attempts to hide these sites, saying they would always be watching.

It has been a busy couple of months for the group, which has been cited as an off-shoot of the Anonymous group. In August, around one million account details from businesses were leaked, while in October it released student records from the world's top 100 universities. Last month it was the Russians' turn, with 2.5 million records from government and businesses put online. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Think crypto hides you from spooks on Facebook? THINK AGAIN
Traffic fingerprints reveal all, say boffins
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Germany 'accidentally' snooped on John Kerry and Hillary Clinton
Dragnet surveillance picks up EVERYTHING, USA, m'kay?
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.