Feeds

AI boffins take on Angry Birds

Sydney competition pits programmers against pigs

The next step in data security

Sydney, Australia, today hosted the first day of a competition to pit humans against artificial intelligence, with the two sources of reasoning competing in rampantly-popular game Angry Birds.

The challenge was hosted by the Australian National University's Artificial Intelligence Group, where Associate Professor Jochen Renz earlier this year realised Angry Birds offers several of the problems researchers in the field are tackling.

“Angry Birds looks like an easy problem, but is actually very hard,” Renz told The Register. “You need to solve computer vision, learning and diagnosis problems to play the game. Those are some of the different sub-groups of artificial intelligence, so we [from the group] were all able to work together on the problem.”

Renz also felt a competition would advance research on the project, an idea he conceived of in June but was only able to activate five weeks ago due to unexpected complexities preparing for the event. 16 teams have entered but half dropped out, stumped by the challenge.

Renz and his colleagues have created Angry Birds playing app, dubbed NAÏVE, that offers a model of the game and can play it passably well by simulating the mouse drags and clicks that launch birds. The app is a Chrome extension and the competition takes place within the Chrome Web Store version of the game. Competitors can build on NAÏVE or create their own code.

Renz said the team approached Rovio for help to conduct the project, received no response, and has therefore reverse engineered some aspects of the game to make the extension work.

The aim of the challenge is not to test for the best possible trajectory and then fire off a bird in the knowledge it will do a lot of damage, then repeating the process in the hope that the birds on offer will do the job. Instead, Renz hopes participants will find the best ways to solve the problem presented by each level, even if that means some birds don’t achieve high scores but do some useful damage advantageous to subsequent missiles.

At the time of writing, the first round of contestants were close to completing their allotted hour of pig-pounding action. Several had successfully completed the ten custom levels created for the event.

Tomorrow, those scores will be put to the test against human combatants, to test whether the best-performing AIs can match it with people.

Upon completion of the human vs. AI bout, Renz will release NAÏVE’s source code. We’ll bring you that link, and the results, as soon as they come to hand. Or should that be trotter? ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
SCREW YOU, Russia! NASA lobs $6.8bn at Boeing AND SpaceX to run space station taxis
Musk charging nearly half as much as Boeing for crew trips
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Thought that last dinosaur was BIG? This one's bloody ENORMOUS
Weighed several adult elephants, contend boffins
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
India's MOM Mars mission makes final course correction
Mangalyaan probe will feel the burn of orbital insertion on September 24th
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub
Boozed-up ancients drank beer before tearing corpses apart
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.