Feeds

Operation Hunt the Hunter: Anonymous targets 'revenge porn' man

The unidentifiable in pursuit of the unpalatable

Website security in corporate America

Hacktivist collective Anonymous has set its sights on the former owner of a "revenge porn" website.

Hunter Moore gained internet infamy by posting sexually revealing images of men and women without their permission, alongside links to their social networking profiles. The images were normally submitted by aggrieved ex-boyfriends or ex-girlfriends. Victims who requested the removal of images were further ridiculed. Legal threats were routinely ignored: however in the end Moore's website IsAnyoneUp.com was sold to an anti-bullying charity.

Moore's fresh plans to relaunch a similar site have provoked the ire of elements of Anonymous. Putative plans to post victims' home addresses, since denied by Moore, only served to further inflame the controversy.

Anonymous characterised Moore as a bully and facilitator of abuse who would be held "accountable for his actions".

"We will protect anyone who is victimised by abuse of our internet, we will prevent the stalking, rape, and possible murders as by-product of his sites," the group said.

"Operation anti-bully. Operation hunt Hunter engaged. We are Anonymous, we are legion, we do not forgive, we do not forget, Hunter Moore, expect us," it added.

A video by Anonymous featured Amanda Todd, 15, who took her own life after being bullied following the publication of topless pictures of her on the net. Todd was not featured on Moore's website.

Anonymous published personal details about Moore online, including his home address and the names of family members, the BBC reports.

IsAnyoneUp.com reportedly pulled in $20,000 in advertising revenue a month prior to the sale. Moore blamed the media for distorting his original vision, promising that his new site would be "very scary but yet fun".

"I am creating something that will question if you ever want to have kids," he boasted.

Moore told tech site Betabeat that his new venture would "introduce the mapping stuff so you can stalk people" a statement he retracted in subsequent interviews, claiming it was only a drunken boast. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Hackers pop Brazil newspaper to root home routers
Step One: try default passwords. Step Two: Repeat Step One until success
UK.gov lobs another fistful of change at SME infosec nightmares
Senior Lib Dem in 'trying to be relevant' shocker. It's only taxpayers' money, after all
Critical Adobe Reader and Acrobat patches FINALLY make it out
Eight vulns healed, including XSS and DoS paths
Spies would need SUPER POWERS to tap undersea cables
Why mess with armoured 10kV cables when land-based, and legal, snoop tools are easier?
TOR users become FBI's No.1 hacking target after legal power grab
Be afeared, me hearties, these scoundrels be spying our signals
Blood-crazed Microsoft axes Trustworthy Computing Group
Security be not a dirty word, me Satya. But crevice, bigod...
Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign
Claim of tapped undersea cable refuted by Kiwi PM as Kim claims extradition plot
Freenode IRC users told to change passwords after securo-breach
Miscreants probably got in, you guys know the drill by now
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.