Feeds

Operation Hunt the Hunter: Anonymous targets 'revenge porn' man

The unidentifiable in pursuit of the unpalatable

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

Hacktivist collective Anonymous has set its sights on the former owner of a "revenge porn" website.

Hunter Moore gained internet infamy by posting sexually revealing images of men and women without their permission, alongside links to their social networking profiles. The images were normally submitted by aggrieved ex-boyfriends or ex-girlfriends. Victims who requested the removal of images were further ridiculed. Legal threats were routinely ignored: however in the end Moore's website IsAnyoneUp.com was sold to an anti-bullying charity.

Moore's fresh plans to relaunch a similar site have provoked the ire of elements of Anonymous. Putative plans to post victims' home addresses, since denied by Moore, only served to further inflame the controversy.

Anonymous characterised Moore as a bully and facilitator of abuse who would be held "accountable for his actions".

"We will protect anyone who is victimised by abuse of our internet, we will prevent the stalking, rape, and possible murders as by-product of his sites," the group said.

"Operation anti-bully. Operation hunt Hunter engaged. We are Anonymous, we are legion, we do not forgive, we do not forget, Hunter Moore, expect us," it added.

A video by Anonymous featured Amanda Todd, 15, who took her own life after being bullied following the publication of topless pictures of her on the net. Todd was not featured on Moore's website.

Anonymous published personal details about Moore online, including his home address and the names of family members, the BBC reports.

IsAnyoneUp.com reportedly pulled in $20,000 in advertising revenue a month prior to the sale. Moore blamed the media for distorting his original vision, promising that his new site would be "very scary but yet fun".

"I am creating something that will question if you ever want to have kids," he boasted.

Moore told tech site Betabeat that his new venture would "introduce the mapping stuff so you can stalk people" a statement he retracted in subsequent interviews, claiming it was only a drunken boast. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
14 antivirus apps found to have security problems
Vendors just don't care, says researcher, after finding basic boo-boos in security software
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers
Corporate raiders Comment Crew fingered for attacks
Only '3% of web servers in top corps' fully fixed after Heartbleed snafu
Just slapping a patched OpenSSL on a machine ain't going to cut it, we're told
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.