Feeds

Chinese state media accuses Cisco and other US giants of spying

Huawei oh Huawei would they say such things?

Security for virtualized datacentres

State mouthpieces in China have published a series of articles attacking Cisco, accusing the networking giant of being complicit in US attacks on its infrastructure.

The first coverage seems to have appeared as the cover story in China Economic and Information Technology Magazine, and doesn't mince words in laying into Cisco, and the US, claiming that ninety per cent of "network warfare" originates from the land of the free and that China Unicom has been sweeping out Cisco kit in preference for home-grown alternatives.

The evidence presented against Cisco is pretty circumstantial, references to known security flaws and quotes from unnamed "experts" claiming that in an emergency the US Government could take control of China's backbone communications. The article also names IBM, Google, Qualcomm, Intel, Apple, Oracle and Microsoft (making up the "Diamond Eight"), but is clearly motivated by US investigations into Huawei and ZTE which recommended they should be treated with suspicion.

Some 72 US Congressmen have shares in Cisco, the magazine points out, paralleling US reports of Huawei's governmental links - though it also reminds readers that the Patriot Act obliges technology companies to help the US government in its spying efforts.

And it's not just one magazine making these claims. Tech In Asia spotted similar reports in Caijing National Weekly, People's Daily and China Enterprise Report, all of which (the site states) are government-owned media outlets, and all of which are generating concern about the preponderance of Cisco kit in key communication hubs.

The Americans are used to throwing their economic weight around to get what they want, but won't take it well when the same tactic is used against them. Some of those behind the US blacklisting of Huawei and ZTE are clearly protectionist, worried about high-tech jobs going to Asia, but many Americans are genuinely worried about the threat posed by Chinese technology.

In China they can be protectionist too, and with some more articles like this they'll soon be equally paranoid as well. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
Symantec backs out of Backup Exec: Plans to can appliance in Jan
Will still provide support to existing customers
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.