Feeds

One in 10 Brit smartphone owners 'can't afford' to pay for apps

Beggared themselves buying iPhones, now can't find 69p

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

Brits like smartphones, but half of them don't like paying for apps and two-fifths of those who've downloaded one say they'd never hand over cash for the privilege.

The numbers come from MyVoucherCodes, which asked 2,611 British app downloaders what they thought the apps were worth, with only 27 per cent saying they regularly paid for software (spending an average £5.20 a month) while the rest used the free stuff so abundant in all the app stores.

Of the four in 10 survey respondents who said they'd never pay for an app, a 29 per cent slice (totalling 10 per cent of all respondents) said it was because they couldn't afford them, while the remaining 71 per cent said it was because the software was "overpriced".

Americans, meanwhile, are using their mobiles for just about everything, according to the latest figures from Pew Internet (PDF, less interesting than one might imagine). A third are now banking on their mobile phones, and a similar number turn to the mobile internet when seeking medical advice, which is a scary thought.

The increased use of internet services on phones - which according to the survey has hit 44 per cent - shouldn't be surprising. Phones are much better at displaying websites than they used to be and websites are increasingly phone-friendly. Pew, which spoke to 2,582 Americans, also reckons the use of a phone to capture photographs and video is on the rise, now at 82 per cent.

Forty-three per cent of Americans have apparently downloaded apps onto their phones, but Pew didn't note what proportion of them had paid for the content, though it does tell us that rich people are more likely to download apps - 57 per cent of those with an income greater than $75,000, compared to 32 per cent of those earning less than $30,000 - but that's probably because rich people have better phones.

MyVoucherCodes didn't break down the phone models either, though previous studies and app store statistics have shown Android users to be more inclined towards freebies than iOS users. Some of that will be down to the historical lack of international payment gateways on Google Play (which promoted Angry Birds to go free) and Google's decision to let those without a credit card download free apps. ®

Seven Steps to Software Security

More from The Register

next story
Whoah! How many Google Play apps want to read your texts?
Google's app permissions far too lax – security firm survey
Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS
Google is only now fixing ancient, energy-sapping bug
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
OpenWRT gets native IPv6 slurping in major refresh
Also faster init and a new packages system
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.