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McAfee takes time off blogging to concentrate on being chased by police

He 'almost' sold tat to reporter while disguised as a peddler

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Followers of on-the-run cybersecurity baron John McAfee will be sorry to hear that he won't be updating his blog for the next few days. The billionaire inventor of McAfee antivirus software told friend Chad Essley this morning that "something had happened" and that he needed to move to another location.

Despite being the target of Central America's most-publicised manhunt, McAfee has had time to post nine blogs in the past three days. He has also detailed his various disguises, the latest of which involved smearing himself with shoe polish and pretending to be a Guatemalan trinket peddler, complete with a faked limp and a "shaved" tampon up his right nostril. McAfee is still being hunted by the police in Belize who want to question him about the murder of his neighbour, Gregory Faull.

John McAfee's blog header, screengrab

John McAfee's blog

McAfee blogged on Tuesday about the elaborate aural surveillance system he set up in the months before the murder - attaching recorders to his employees, friends and even dogs and posting the sound file of a conversation in Creole where he alleges a former local official tries to persuade his employee to kill him.

On Monday McAfee posted a meditative blog post about the place of bar girls in Belizean society, based on the story of Timesha, a former bar girl in the Belizean town of Orange Walk, who met McAfee two years ago in a "lover's bar". The antivirus millionaire says he bought her a house and she went back to school.

The blog, The Hinterland, is managed by McAfee's friend, Portland film-maker Chad Essley, and is believed to be genuine.

Posting late on Monday night on his blog McAfee revealed that after disguising himself as a drunk German tourist and a burrito seller over the weekend, he has tweaked his disguise again and is posing as a poor Guatemalan peddler selling carved wooden dolphins. He said the shaved tampon was intended to make his nose look deformed. He claims he almost sold a dolphin to an Associated Press reporter, but the journalist was pulled away on a phone call.

Watch this space. ®

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