Feeds

.WTF? Governments object to .sucks, .army and .airforce

ICANN releases lists of government objections to new gTLDs

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

The world's governments have had their say about new generic top level domains (gTLDs), lodging more than 200 objections laid to proposed new names.

Australia, oddly, leads the list of complainants, racking up more than 100 with objections to .sucks and .wtf (on grounds that the name has “has an overtly negative or critical connotation” and that applicants don't have the processes in place to deal with “defensive registrations”).

The antipodean nation also objects to Symantec's bid for .antivirus, saying it “is seeking exclusive access to a common generic string that relates to a broad market sector.”

Australia also hands out a beating to Amazon.com, objecting to applications for generic terms such as .app, .book, .cloud, .store and more, in multiple languages.

Amazon also generated an objection from Peru and Brazil, which together point out that Amazon.com's attempt to own .amazon “would prevent the use of this domain for purposes of public interest related to the protection, promotion and awareness raising on issues related to the Amazon biome” and would also be a problem for the many nations in the Amazon basin and the work of the Amazon Cooperation Treaty Organization.

In a similar vein, Argentina objects to clothing company Patagonia's request for .patagonia, a region that is lies within Argentine borders.

The USA objects to the .army, .airforce and .navy domains because “The string is confusingly similar to the name of a specific government agency”. India also found fault with those three, warning of national security implications if an entity could use such domain names and pointing out that in India the names are protected by law.

India also opposes the creation of .halal, arguing that “there are specific restrictions on the certification of food items as 'Halal.' There is no certainty that the applicant will conform to rules and regulations regarding this type of food item in India.”

Several African nations and the African Union Commission don't want .africa to be used, because the applicant is not the agreed registrant already appointed to oversee the domain.

The “early warnings” about national objections to gTLDs, as the objections are formally known, don't mean the domains will never be signed off. Further discussions and mediations remain an option for would-be registrants keen to pursue a claim.

The full list of government objections is available here. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
Lavabit loses contempt of court appeal over protecting Snowden, customers
Judges rule complaints about government power are too little, too late
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Edward Snowden on his Putin TV appearance: 'Why all the criticism?'
Denies Q&A cameo was meant to slam US, big-up Russia
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Judge halts spread of zombie Nortel patents to Texas in Google trial
Epic Rockstar patent war to be waged in California
US Supreme Court supremo rakes Aereo lawman in oral arguments
Antenna-array content streamers: 'Ruling against us could dissipate the cloud'
German space centre endures cyber attack
Chinese code retrieved but NSA hack not ruled out
prev story

Whitepapers

Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.