Feeds

US federal transport crash investigators ditch BlackBerry for iPhones

Hm, this train wreck seems to involve RIM in some way

High performance access to file storage

The US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has followed other federal agencies in ditching Blackberry for iPhone.

But it's not just because they love the retina screen, the public sector agency has blamed their Blackberry devices for being unreliable in a document on the FedBizOpps site explaining why they are switching to the iPhone 5.

The agency has to deal with transport accident scenes including plane and rail crashes and says they require "effective, reliable and stable communication capabilities to carry-out its primary investigative mission and to ensure employee safety in remote locations."

BlackBerry Curve 9320

Blackberry 10 is out in January, will it be enough to restore trust in the devices?

Blackberries "have been failing both at inopportune times and at an unacceptable rate" says the NTSB, in a harsh critique.

The Agency have a contract with Verizon and will use their "device refresh offer" to bring in iPhone 5s. The NTSB has about 400 workers.

The NTSB already use iPads so the agency says that standardising with another iOS device would be useful, and that support networks are in place to deal with iOS. This would seem to indicate the advantage that iPad penetration in business has for Apple.

Paul Lucier, RIM's vice president for global government solutions, told USA Today that government agencies can trust the security and reliability of Blackberries nonetheless.

"BlackBerry remains the most reliable, secure and robust end-to-end mobile communications platform available," Lucier says. "We have 1 million government customers in North America alone who depend on BlackBerry, and more than 400,000 government customers worldwide upgraded their devices in the past year."

Other, bigger, US federal agencies have switched to iPhone too in the past few years including the Transport Security Administration (TSA). ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet
Maria Miller finally resigns over expenses row
Skype pimps pro-level broadcast service
Playing Cat and Mouse with the media
Beat it, freetards! Dyn to shut down no-cost dynamic DNS next month
... but don't worry, charter members, you're still in 'for life'
Like Google, Comcast might roll its own mobile voice network
Says anything's possible if regulators approve merger with Time Warner
EE dismisses DATA-BURNING glitch with Orange Mail app
Bug quietly slurps PAYG credit - yet EE denies it exists
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.