Feeds

Prince William 'day with my chopper' pics reveal more than intended

Palace whoopsie leads to embarrassing exposures

SANS - Survey on application security programs

The UK's Ministry of Defence was obliged to reset user names and passwords following the publication of pictures of the Duke of Cambridge at work on a military base.

Four of the 10 pictures, released by St James's Palace, showed Prince William at work at RAF Valley but failed to blur or disguise sensitive information in background. An "administrative oversight" meant the pictures were published on the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s official website before they were cleared by the MoD, The Daily Telegraph reports.

This turned out to be a significant oversight because potential sensitive information was visible on computer screens and bulletin boards in the background of shots taken at the RAF base in north Wales, where the prince serves as a search and rescue helicopter pilot. The images were quickly pulled from the website once the mistake became apparent but not before the images had been widely reproduced.

The pictures, taken by an RAF photographer, were later re-issued with sensitive details pixellated. In one image the Duke is shown sharing a joke with colleagues in a briefing room in front of a computer showing a password prompt screen. The MoD reset potentially exposed passwords as a precaution.

A Ministry of Defence spokesman told The Daily Telegraph: "Due to an administrative oversight, these photographs were not properly cleared at RAF Valley and the images showed unclassified MoD user names, passwords and computer screens on a restricted system."

"The passwords and user names shown have now been reset as a precaution and we are satisfied the images do not contravene security regulations."

"All the photos have been now amended and reissued. Media organisations are kindly asked to use these images," he added.

The paper adds that the websites logins depicted in the photos relate to unclassified websites used by Sea King helicopter pilots to calculate fuel requirements and to access the Civil Aviation Authority. More on the story, complete with more pictures, can be found in a Daily Mail article here.

An explanation of the typical "working day in the life of Flight Lieutenant Wales" on the Duke's official website reveals that he and his crew-mates like to play Call of Duty in their spare time, in between briefings, training exercises, standby shifts and rescue sorties.

Downtime is also an important part of the job. When the crew is not conducting a search and rescue mission or preparing for a training exercise, they can usually be found re-charging their batteries in the crew-room or eating a meal in the nearby dining room. Computer games – especially the likes of Call of Duty and other military-themed games – are a favourite for the crew if they have a spare moment in the evenings. However, they must remain in constant contact and can never be more than 60 seconds away from their aircraft in case an emergency call comes in.

RAF search and rescue squadrons handle on average around 2,000 call-outs a year. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
NSA denies it knew about and USED Heartbleed encryption flaw for TWO YEARS
Agency forgets it exists to protect communications, not just spy on them
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.