Feeds

YARR! Library Wi-Fi PIRATES can't be touched by Queen's men!

Who would win in a fight between librarians and pirates?

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Identifying your nearest public library will soon be dead easy: just look for the skull-and-crossbones flag draped over the entrance, or follow the greasy-haired blokes in trench coats.

Communications watchdog Ofcom confirmed on Tuesday that libraries, universities and public Wi-Fi network providers will be exempt from anti-piracy measures in the Digital Economy Act. Yarr! Raise anchor and prepare yer selves for some hearty plundering of the torrents.

Pirates ahoy!

While serial copyright infringers who are wired up to the UK's biggest ISPs at home can expect to receive written warnings in around a year from now - yes, after more delays - public internet providers will be classed as "communication providers", and are exempt.

So, for that matter, are mobile networks - but they tend to keep a tighter grip on their network traffic in any case. Ofcom's head of copyright Justin Le Patourel confirmed the freetard-friendly policy at a Westminster Media Forum event.

The regulator has examined areas such as an infringement notification fee, whether the Digital Economy Act has impacted "cross-subsidies between actors", and other arcana.

Yes, we do have the rights to this photo. Copyright us.

At last: these persecuted men have somewhere safe to go … the public library

The Reg asked Le Patourel if Ofcom conducted any research into a possible migration of pirates from home connections into these new safe havens. The answer, surprisingly, was: no. Ofcom hasn't researched this at all. Le Patourel said he thought the level of infringement in libraries and public Wi-Fi hotspots was likely to be low, at least to begin with. But clearly, this may well change next year.

It simply doesn't make sense to download pirate material at home when you can do it with impunity elsewhere - all at someone else's expense. There's plenty of room to accommodate the new arrivals: it's not as if many libraries have very many books or people in them these days. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
4chan outraged by Emma Watson nudie photo leak SCAM
In the immortal words of Shaggy, it wasn't me us ... amirite?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.