Feeds

Chinese regulator pays to bust state internet monopoly

Command economics will see state-funded take on state-owned telcos

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

China’s broadcasting regulator is set to launch a new government-financed broadband and cable TV service provider with a mission to break the monopoly of the country’s three telecoms giants … all of which are also state-owned.

The State Administration of Radio, Film and Television (SARFT) – which functions like a Chinese version of the UK’s Ofcom, but with a much greater emphasis on censorship – is working on the proposals in response to a directive from the State Council back in 2010.

The project is set to get 4.5bn yuan (£453m) in start-up capital from the government and receive a special license from the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, allowing the new company to operate across telecoms, broadband and cable TV networks, according to Sina Tech (via TechInAsia)

Aside from unifying these three networks for the first time in China, it is hoped the Radio and Television Network Company, as the new entity is likely to be called, will break the monopoly of the current incumbents, China Mobile, China Unicom and China Telecom.

The logic behind this one isn’t completely apparent, however, given that these three firms are also state-owned and indulge in the kind of gloves-off competition one would expect between privately-owned rivals.

The choice of SARFT as the government body to run the new broadband and cable TV provider may also raise concerns over the level of censorship that content provided by said firm will be subject to.

The regulator has made a name for itself over the years for first increasing its remit to include areas such as online video and then enforcing strict guidelines banning “vulgar content” and limiting the volume of foreign-made TV in China. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.