Feeds

Apple said to have let the name of the next OS X cat out of the bag

It's not Garfield, Felix, Bill, nor 'in-the-Hat'

Mobile application security vulnerability report

Apple is said to have chosen the feline nomenclature for its next iteration of OS X, and according to the customary "reliable source," that name is to be "Lynx".

We suggest, however, that you take this rumor with more than the traditional grain of salt. As AppleScoop reports, their source is not a Cupertinian per se, but rather a worthy "who claims to have talked to someone from inside the walls of Apple."

That said, Lynx would fit in well with the gaggle of kitties that have been used to name Apple's OS X – changed from Mac OS X with the release of Mountain Lion – since it came out of public beta in March 2001.

That beta, by the way, was named after Ursus arctos middendorffi – aka Kodiak – a rather large, nasty North American brown bear.

After OS X's developer preview released in March 1999, an exceptionally problematic public beta was made available in September 2000. The first shipping version that was graced with a version number was released in March 2001, but even the most fervent fanbois reluctantly agree that Mac OS X wasn't fully baked until version 10.2, Jaguar, in August 2002.

Here's a chronology of the various iterations of Mac OS X, beginning with the aforementioned public beta – which, by the way, wasn't a free beta, but rather one which charged the faithful $29.95 for the privilege of buggy endurance:

  • Public Beta: Kodiak - September 2000
  • 10.0: Cheetah – March 2001
  • 10.1: Puma – September 2001
  • 10.2: Jaguar – August 2002
  • 10.3: Panther – October 2003
  • 10.4: Tiger – April 2005
  • 10.5: Leopard – October 2007
  • 10.6: Snow Leopard – August 2009
  • 10.7: Lion – July 2011
  • 10.8: Mountain Lion – July 2012

We may learn whether AppleScoop's "reliable source" is correct about Lynx during the opening keynote at Apple's as-yet-unscheduled 2013 Worldwide Developers Conference, likely to be held in June or thereabouts, a common venue for OS X announcements.

What remains both unknown and unrumored, however, is what Apple plans to do after OS X 10.9 – OS X 10.10? Perhaps by then, however, Cupertino will have merged OS X and iOS into "One OS to Rule Them All", as Microsoft chairman Bill Gates says is the future of Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8. ®

The Power of One Infographic

More from The Register

next story
KDE releases ice-cream coloured Plasma 5 just in time for summer
Melty but refreshing - popular rival to Mint's Cinnamon's still a work in progress
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.