Feeds

Apple said to have let the name of the next OS X cat out of the bag

It's not Garfield, Felix, Bill, nor 'in-the-Hat'

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Apple is said to have chosen the feline nomenclature for its next iteration of OS X, and according to the customary "reliable source," that name is to be "Lynx".

We suggest, however, that you take this rumor with more than the traditional grain of salt. As AppleScoop reports, their source is not a Cupertinian per se, but rather a worthy "who claims to have talked to someone from inside the walls of Apple."

That said, Lynx would fit in well with the gaggle of kitties that have been used to name Apple's OS X – changed from Mac OS X with the release of Mountain Lion – since it came out of public beta in March 2001.

That beta, by the way, was named after Ursus arctos middendorffi – aka Kodiak – a rather large, nasty North American brown bear.

After OS X's developer preview released in March 1999, an exceptionally problematic public beta was made available in September 2000. The first shipping version that was graced with a version number was released in March 2001, but even the most fervent fanbois reluctantly agree that Mac OS X wasn't fully baked until version 10.2, Jaguar, in August 2002.

Here's a chronology of the various iterations of Mac OS X, beginning with the aforementioned public beta – which, by the way, wasn't a free beta, but rather one which charged the faithful $29.95 for the privilege of buggy endurance:

  • Public Beta: Kodiak - September 2000
  • 10.0: Cheetah – March 2001
  • 10.1: Puma – September 2001
  • 10.2: Jaguar – August 2002
  • 10.3: Panther – October 2003
  • 10.4: Tiger – April 2005
  • 10.5: Leopard – October 2007
  • 10.6: Snow Leopard – August 2009
  • 10.7: Lion – July 2011
  • 10.8: Mountain Lion – July 2012

We may learn whether AppleScoop's "reliable source" is correct about Lynx during the opening keynote at Apple's as-yet-unscheduled 2013 Worldwide Developers Conference, likely to be held in June or thereabouts, a common venue for OS X announcements.

What remains both unknown and unrumored, however, is what Apple plans to do after OS X 10.9 – OS X 10.10? Perhaps by then, however, Cupertino will have merged OS X and iOS into "One OS to Rule Them All", as Microsoft chairman Bill Gates says is the future of Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
SMASH the Bash bug! Apple and Red Hat scramble for patch batches
'Applying multiple security updates is extremely difficult'
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.