Feeds

Google seen sniffing over a Dish of mobile spectrum

Could we be looking at Oompa Loompas up cell towers?

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Google has been chatting to Dish about cooperatively launching a mobile phone network in the USA, using the same loophole LightSquared failed to exploit to build a national network.

It's not just Google that Dish is taking to, the TV company has been looking for a partner for some time and is open to discussions with anyone, but the Wall Street Journal reckons Google has been in discussions with Dish lately though even the paper admits they may yet come to nothing.

Dish certainly wants to roll out a mobile network, having seen LightSquared fail at the final fence in its attempt. Both companies own frequencies designated for satellite use, but in the USA such owners are also permitted to deploy ground stations in the same band, to fill in shadows and improve building penetration: a loophole LightSquared hoped to use and Dish plans to.

LightSquared got permission from the FCC to deploy such a ground network, but then lost it again when it was unable to appease the GPS industry who were spectrally next door. Dish doesn't have that problem, though it does have Sprint next door, and Sprint has asked the FCC to require Dish to shuffle 5 MHz up the dial away from them.

The FCC hasn't approved Dish's request for permission to build a ground network, saying in March that it would have to confer until the end of 2012, but without the GPS crowd complaining it's likely to give approval - so Dish is concentrating on ensuring the FCC ignores Sprint's request.

The bands Dish wants to use lie across the globally-standard 3G bands, but other than neighbouring Sprint they're perfectible usable and are now approved by the 3GPP (LTE recognised band number 23) but Dish will need partners to fund the building of the network.

LightSquared had a deal with Sprint, but now that Softbank is taking an interest and Sprint is buying up US Cellular customers and bandwidth, it's unlikely a similar deal will happen. AT&T might take a punt but has extensive plans of its own, so an outside partner like Google might be more interesting. Google certainly has the cash, but whether it has the inclination is another question entirely. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Broadband sellers in the UK are UP TO no good, says Which?
Speedy network claims only apply to 10% of customers
Virgin Media struck dumb by NATIONWIDE packet loss balls-up
Turning it off and on again fixes glitch 12 HOURS LATER
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
Ofcom tackles complaint over Premier League footie TV rights
Virgin Media: UK fans pay the most for the fewest matches
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.