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Anonymous attacks Israeli websites over Gaza bombings

Releases kit to keep Palestinians online

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Hackers operating for Anonymous have been launching DDoS attacks and defacing websites to demonstrate their displeasure at Israel's recent military action in the Gaza Strip, which is currently in its second day.

According to its Twitter feed, the group claims to have taken down or defaced over 40 government and military websites in three hours on Thursday morning, and it has warned of more attacks to come in what it's calling #OpIsrael. The group said it had been provoked by Israel's "insane attack" and by threats that the army would cut off internet communications with Gaza.

"When the government of Israel publicly threatened to sever all internet and other telecommunications into and out of Gaza they crossed a line in the sand," the group said on Twitter. "As the former dictator of Egypt Mubarack learned the hard way – we are ANONYMOUS and NO ONE shuts down the Internet on our watch."

So far the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) don’t exactly seem to be quaking in their boots but some minor sites have been defaced with messages supporting the Palestinians. The hackers also issued a copy of the traditional video threat:

The group also released information packs in English and Arabic containing tips and contacts for the residents of Gaza to use in the event of communications going down. So far there has been no official word of any Israeli internet blockade plans, however, and the website for the Palestinian Telecommunication Group is still working as The Reg goes to press.

These kind of Anonymous operations usually last a few days and then fade away, but this time the hackers and DDoS attackers may have bitten off more than they can chew. The IDF is probably the best in the business when it comes to online security (behind the NSA) and if this is the usual script kiddies using duff tools, they could find themselves fingered very quickly. ®

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