Feeds

Fujitsu: We're not blacklisted by gov, but we want private work

Grey men of Whitehall confirm there's no black list

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Fujitsu’s UK CEO says the company is continuing to bid for UK public sector contracts, but the share of its business coming from the public purse will continue to decline over the next few years.

Duncan Tait said the firm had been rebalancing its UK business over the last two years to boost the amount of revenue it generates from the private sector.

Tait was speaking to The Register two months after the Financial Times claimed Fujitsu had been deemed “too high risk” to take on further government work and effectively placed on a “blacklist” of suppliers which would no longer be offered public sector contracts by Whitehall.

Tait said last week there was no blacklist with Fujitsu’s name on it, adding: “We continue to seek business in the public sector.”

He added that in the “meantime, we’re continuing to work closely with Francis Maude and his department” as it looks to drive efficiency in the public sector.

On the suggestion that Fujitsu was a “high risk” supplier, Tait said there were only two plausible reasons why a supplier would attract that label: bad service and financial risk.

On bad service, he said: “That’s not what our customers are telling us.” He said the feedback on its service for "most government departments is extremely positive".

As for financial risk, he said, the company had very low levels of debt and was profitable.

He added that there was a vast amount of public sector business beyond Whitehall, from local councils and authorities to the Scottish Parliament and Welsh Assemblies, as well as the education sector. Any Whitehall blacklist - if it existed, which it doesn't - would not constrain Fujitsu in competing for business away from central government.

Nevertheless, Fujitsu’s UK business was in the process of rebalancing its business towards private sector business, he explained. A couple of years ago, public sector revenues accounted for 70 per cent of the IT giant's UK business. The balance now was 55/45 in favour of public sector he said.

The companies’ current three-year plan was for private sector business to account for 60 per cent of its revenues. “If we can do that over the next year, great,” Tait added.

The firm was currently seeing significant year-on-year growth, he said. The third quarter should be "decent" he said, while Q4 should be "pretty stellar".

Tait’s own background is in private rather than public sector IT. Before taking over the CEO post at Fujitsu's UK business, he had headed up the vendor’s private sector business.

A Cabinet Office spokesman said: "There is no 'blacklist' of suppliers and we will neither name nor shame companies. However, we are determined to drive even better value when we are spending taxpayers' money." ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine
Activists told NOT to snap pics of staff at the concrete doughnut
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?
Stop bitching about firearms fees - we need computerisation
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.