Feeds

Thousands of Australians and satellite view spectacular total eclipse

Dark Dawn Down Under wows crowds and boffins

New hybrid storage solutions

Vids As Aussies enjoyed a spectacular total eclipse of the Sun lastnight, the European Space Agency's Proba-2 satellite orbiting out in space also got an eyeful as it passed in and out of the moon's shadow zone.

Proba-2, a Sun-watching sat, orbits the Earth around 14.5 times a day. It dipped in and out of the Moon's shadow during the total solar eclipse as viewed from Earth. The spacecraft got three views of the eclipse yesterday but the Sun was never completely gone, making each a partial eclipse.

The video above was put together from the images snapped by the sat's SWAP imager. From SWAP's ultraviolet view, stormy active regions on the Sun were shown, including sunspots, the roots of large solar flares.

“The satellite also spent hours collecting data of the solar environment further away from the Sun before and after the main eclipse event, providing context for the ground-based observations,” said Joe Zender, Proba-2 mission manager.

Looking closely at the Sun is only possible from the ground during eclipses, when the bright star is obscured, briefly showing the corona and the red glow of the chromosphere.

“Combining visible light observations with the extreme ultraviolet images from Proba-2 gives us a unique opportunity to access difficult-to-see regions of the Sun at different wavelengths, during a rare event such as a total solar eclipse,” added Zender.

On the ground, Proba-2 boffin Anik De Groof was watching the two-minute total eclipse with thousands of Australians on the coast at Palm Cove.

“We got all a bit nervous when after sunrise the partially eclipsed Sun was covered by a big cloud, but 5 minutes before totality, the cloud dissolved and we could watch ‘Baily’s beads’ form – the effect where beads of sunlight shine through the rugged lunar landscape,” said De Groof.

“At totality we could see the red chromosphere and the corona in the most beautiful conditions – it was fantastic!” ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Thought that last dinosaur was BIG? This one's bloody ENORMOUS
Weighed several adult elephants, contend boffins
Chelyabinsk-sized SURPRISE asteroid to skim Earth, satnav birds
Space rock appears out of nowhere, buzzes planet on Sunday
City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub
Boozed-up ancients drank beer before tearing corpses apart
'Duck face' selfie in SPAAAACE: Rosetta's snap with bird comet
Probe prepares to make first landing on fast-moving rock
Square Kilometre Array reveals its 1.6TB-a-day storage and network rigs
Boolardy Engineering Test Array - aka BETA - is about to come out of Beta
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.