Feeds

Finns look to bring Phorm style stalker ads to UK radio streaming

Hey, your mobile kit is probably tracking you already

The essential guide to IT transformation

UTuneMe has invited UK radio stations to sign up to its embedded advertising, promising to deliver targeted audio ads in the same way Google delivers online ones, personalised for the listener.

The idea is that targeted adverts pay better, but while websites have half a dozen companies which will happily drop targeted ads into their content - notably Google, but also Opera and many others - and YoSpace is busy doing the same thing with video, the opportunity to target audio advertising is woefully unexploited, something UTuneMe aims to remedy.

UTuneMe's ads will only be available to listeners are using the UTuneMe mobile app, so more like Opera than Google or Phorm, and users will opt into the scheme during the installation process, after which targeted adverts will start being dropped into the stream.

The UTuneMe app will also collect location data from the handset, enabling ads to be targeted by location as well as enabling demographic and behavioural profiling.

It all sounds quite creepy, but it is far less than Google is already doing for websites, and radio could certainly do with improved revenue. How many listeners are using their phones to listen to streamed radio stations we don't know, but as network coverage improves, the number is likely to rise.

UTuneMe is part funded by the Finnish government though its TEKES programme, which provides match funding for innovative projects, but the company has decided to kick off operations in the UK. The campaign to recruit some radio stations is starting now and the service is slated to be on the air by early next year. ®

Bootnote

Just for perspective, one might note that many if not most kinds of smartphone, phondleslab, fondletop and fondleslab from the major makers track your location - there's no need for a SIM card or GPS, it can be done with nothing more than WiFi - and supply the information to the manufacturer by default. It's a creepy world.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Broadband slow and expensive? Blame Telstra says CloudFlare
Won't peer, will gouge for Internet transit
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?