Feeds

Bangor University touts 20 Gbps access tech

Backbone vendors throw hats in the air

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

A UK university is claiming front-runner status in the development of next-generation optical access networks using optical OFDM (orthogonal frequency division multiplexing) technology.

In a blow for clueless commentators that describe optical networks as obsolete (in Australia, News Limited’s Andrew Bolt is one such anti-fibre cheer-leader), the researchers hope to create optical kit capable of 20 Gbps subscriber speeds as its first step.

Even better, if the Bangor University project succeeds: it would use commercial off-the-shelf components to create drop-in replacement line cards to achieve speeds of as much as 40 Gbps – per subscriber – on PON access networks.

The OCEAN project, whose commercial partners include Fujitsu, Finisar, VPISystems and the Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute, is working on using 32 wavelengths (which is no longer particularly demanding for WDM kit) and says its technology will cover distances of up to 60 km.

Optical OFDM (OOFDM) uses techniques familiar to the radio and ADSL world to overcome dispersion in optical networks. The idea is to use OFDM on each optical signal to replace the more familiar single carrier optical modulation (which becomes more prone to dispersion effects as data rates increase).

OFDM's familiarity in (as just one example) cellular networks means there is a huge base of existing device development the researchers can draw on.

Bangor’s Dr Roger Giddings has told the BCC the university is the first to have an end-to-end system in the works – although the project isn’t due to deliver completed kit for another two years (the three-year OCEAN project began during 2011).

The researchers also claim that OOFDM is less power-hungry than other gigabit-speed access technologies.

The Bangor group has already filed a slew of patents covering its techniques. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
'Serious flaws in the Vertigan report' says broadband boffin
Report 'fails reality test' , is 'simply wrong' and offers ''convenient' justification for FTTN says Rod Tucker
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.