Feeds

Ten... Apple iPad Mini alternatives

Picks for the fruit-phobic fondleslab fancier

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Samsung Galaxy Note 2

RH Numbers

When I reviewed the Note 2, I came to the conclusion it was the most complete digital communications device available. Since then nothing has caused me to change that opinion. Along with the LG Vu, the Note is aimed at those who only want to carry one device that can fulfill the role of both tablet and phone. And covet the Vu though I do, if price is no object the Note 2 is without doubt the better device to fulfill that role, having power, style, performance and screen acreage to excess.

Samsung Galaxy Note 2 GT-N7100 Android smartphone

Dominating proceedings is a 5.5in, 1280 x 720 AMOLED panel which is frankly all the screen you need unless your requirements demand something much, much larger. You also get a manly battery, a curvaceous if plastic body and a truly bewildering amount of extras added to stock Android. Pride of place goes to the digital pen, which lets you indulge in all manner of jiggery pokery and handwriting recognition that actually works. The Note 2 is why Apple is getting worried by Samsung - and there can be no higher accolade.

Rating 85%
Price £516
Info Samsung

Sony Xperia Tablet S

RH Numbers

Since burying the Ericsson brand in a shallow grave, Sony has got its mobile act together in a serious way. Its Xperia phones are coming out of the woodwork and most are pretty good, while the tablet member of the family offers an interesting halfway house between shackled media consumption devices like the Nook and Kindle and those dependent on Google’s still far from perfect - in the UK, at least - Play Store, thanks to Sony’s own Entertainment Network and Reader Store.

Sony Xperia Tablet S

With it’s 9.4in, 1280 x 800 IPS LCD display, Micro SD card slot and 8Mp main camera - granted I don’t know who uses the rear camera on a tablet, but like a condom better to have one and not need it than the other way around - built-in universal IR remote control and a brace of excellent speakers, you get a lot for your money. With prices ranging from £329 for the 16GB Wi-Fi tablet to £429 for the 16GB 3G via 32 and 64GB models the Xperia Tablet range has something for everyone and isn’t bad value either.

Rating 80%
Price £329 (16GB Wi-Fi), £379 (32GB Wi-Fi), £429 (16GB 3G & Wi-Fi), £449 (64GB Wi-Fi)
Info Sony

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Chipmaker FTDI bricking counterfeit kit
USB-serial imitators whacked by driver update
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
DOUBLE BONK: Testy fanbois catch Apple Pay picking pockets
Users wail as tapcash transactions are duplicated
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.