Feeds

WAR HERO PIGEON carrying SECRET WWII CODE found in chimney

Fanciers clamour for brave dead bird to get top gong

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The remains of a World War II homing pigeon carrying a coded message from the D-Day landings has been found in a chimney in Bletchingley, Surrey.

The message is so potentially sensitive that it was handed over to codebreakers at GCHQ, who are now frantically trying to decipher it.

Historians reckon the bird, found by David Martin in his chimney, was almost certainly sent from Nazi-occupied France during the D-Day invasions, when homing pigeons were sent to get around the Churchill-ordered radio blackout.

World War II experts suspect that this particular message was on its way to Bletchley Park 80 miles away, which had a classified pigeon loft.

"We have more than 30 messages from WWII carrier pigeons in our exhibition, but not one is in code," Colin Hill, curator of Bletchley's 'Pigeons at War' exhibition, said.

"The message Mr Martin found must be highly top secret. The aluminium ring found on the bird’s leg tells us it was born in 1940 and we know it’s an Allied Forces pigeon because of the red capsule it was carrying – but that’s all we know.

“We suspect it was flying back to Monty’s HQ or Bletchley Park from Nazi-occupied Normandy during the invasion. I can only presume it became exhausted and attempted to rest on an open chimney – where it valiantly perished.”

Coincidentally, Secret Agent Commander Wilfred "Biffy" Dunderdale, the real-life inspiration for his friend Ian Fleming's James Bond, lived near Martin after the war. Martin said he had the chance to show the bird and the message to Dunderdale before he passed away.

"When I showed him the bird and code the blood drained from his face and he advised us to back off. He said nothing would ever be published," Martin claimed.

Pigeon fanciers have said they want the deceased military bird to be posthumously awarded the Dickin Medal, the highest possible decoration for valour given to animals. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Regin: The super-spyware the security industry has been silent about
NSA fingered as likely source of complex malware family
Why did it take antivirus giants YEARS to drill into super-scary Regin? Symantec responds...
FYI this isn't just going to target Windows, Linux and OS X fans
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Home Office: Fancy flogging us some SECRET SPY GEAR?
If you do, tell NOBODY what it's for or how it works
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
'Regin': The 'New Stuxnet' spook-grade SOFTWARE WEAPON described
'A degree of technical competence rarely seen'
Syrian Electronic Army in news site 'hack' POP-UP MAYHEM
Gigya redirect exploit blamed for pop-rageous ploy
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
prev story

Whitepapers

Seattle children’s accelerates Citrix login times by 500% with cross-tier insight
Seattle Children’s is a leading research hospital with a large and growing Citrix XenDesktop deployment. See how they used ExtraHop to accelerate launch times.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.