Feeds

Greek journo who published list of Swiss bank account holders cleared

Revealing IMF-supplied names didn't violate data privacy

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

A Greek journalist who published the names of 2,000 suspected tax evaders has been cleared of privacy violations.

Kostas Vaxevanis, 46, was found not guilty of breaking data privacy laws for publishing the details of 2,059 Greeks reckoned to have bank accounts in Switzerland in Hot Doc, the weekly magazine he edits.

Tax evasion is widely seen as an important factor in Greek's economic malaise and the failure of local politicians to crack down on alleged evaders implicated by the list has raised suspicions the this might go against the secret vested interests of those in power. The list was supplied to Greek and other European authorities by the IMF's chief Christine Lagarde two years ago.

"It is quite clear the political system did everything not to publish this list," said Vaxevanis, who had faced the prospect of a prison term of up to two years before he was cleared at a hearing before three judges in Athens on Thursday.

"If you look at the names, or the offshore companies linked to certain individuals, you see that these are all friends of those in power. Phoney lists had also begun to circulate. It was time for the truth," Vaxevanis told The Guardian.

The list reportedly includes politicians, businessmen, shipping magnates, doctors and lawyers. None have complained of privacy violations. Greek daily Ta Nea reprinted the list on Monday three days before Vaxevanis' trial.

The Guardian adds that 500 Britons whose name also appears on the list of secret bank accounts in Switzerland are under investigation by HM Revenue and Customs. The papers adds that these investigations are more likely to leads to settlements and fines, where suspicion of tex evasion is substantiated, than criminal prosecutions. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
14 antivirus apps found to have security problems
Vendors just don't care, says researcher, after finding basic boo-boos in security software
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers
Corporate raiders Comment Crew fingered for attacks
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
Four fake Google haxbots hit YOUR WEBSITE every day
Goog the perfect ruse to slip into SEO orfice
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.