Feeds

iPad Mini's quite a handful

Accelerometer could use some extra speed

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

First Fondle Apple's iPad Mini is not easy to hold in one hand.

The Reg's antipodean outpost took advantage of Australia's time zone and popped into a local Apple store to fondle the new slab. We found the mini is everything one would expect of an Apple product: sleek, pretty and simple.

But a couple of issues quickly became apparent.

One was that the accelerometer seems rather lazy: a good second passed before the Min realised it had been tilted from portrait to landscape mode, or vice versa. This issue was apparent on three Minis we handled in the Apple store.

A second issue is that the Mini is quite a handful, if you use one hand to hold it in portrait mode. Your corresponded is, at 190 cm, a hefty chap who requires XL-sized cycling gloves.

Holding the Mini in a single hand as depicted below was not entirely pleasant and isn't something you'd want to do for long if ploughing through a ripping-page turner. The device is light enough to hold by pinching a corner or edge, but that just didn't feel right.

An iPad Mini held in one hand in portrait mode

An iPad Mini held in one hand in portrait mode

In landscape mode the Mini's far easier to handle with just one paw.

An iPad Mini held one-handed in landscape mode

An iPad mini held one-handed in landscape mode

We put the fondleslab through its paces by playing a side-scrolling game and can report smooth video and impressive sound. Movies were crisp and bright, but the sole supplied flick (Cars 2), occupied only a fraction of the screen in either landscape or portrait mode. Quite a lot of pixels weren't troubled by Pixar's poorest effort. iBooks were no harder to read than on any other iDevice.

Overall, the iPad Mini does what it says on the can: offer a smaller iPad. That's not a problem inasmuch as there's clearly a market for smaller tablets.

It may become an issue if one considers that the essence of the iOS experience has now remained unchanged for several years. That leaves the Mini impressive, but hardly likely to excite or set new agendas. That's something new Apple devices used to do single-handedly. ®

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

More from The Register

next story
Report: American tech firms charge Britons a thumping nationality tax
Without representation, too. Time for a Boston (Lincs) Macbook Party?
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad
Apple's fondleslab is the tablet dermatitis sufferers won't want to take
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.