Feeds

Cupertino man jailed for exporting tech to China

No, he's not from Apple...

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

The founder of a Cupertino tech firm has become the latest to fall foul of tough US laws restricting the sale of military technology to China, after he was banged up for over a year.

Fu-Tain Lu was sentenced to 15 months in the slammer after pleading guilty to selling sensitive microwave amplifiers to the People’s Republic without a license, according to the FBI.

Lu is the owner of small-time Silicon Valley biz Fushine Technology, a firm apparently specialising in the sale of components used in comms and radar equipment.

He’s said to have submitted a purchase order to New York-based comms components manufacturer Miteq, at which time he was told that the microwave amplifier on his PO was subject to export restrictions to China.

However, Lu wet ahead and exported it anyway without a Department of Commerce license, to co-defendant Everjet Science and Technology Corporation based in the PRC.

Lu was also charged with lying to federal agents about the intended end-use of the amplifier and the recipient, ordered to pay a $5,000 fine and hand over 36 microwave amplifiers worth $US136,000, according to the FBI.

“The export of these defence articles to the People’s Republic of China or anywhere else in the world is tightly regulated for good reason,” said Clark Settles, special agent in charge of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) San Francisco.

“One of HSI’s top enforcement priorities is preventing US military products and sensitive technology from falling into the hands of those who might seek to harm America or its interests. Requiring exporters to obtain licenses before shipping controlled technology to restricted countries is a vital precaution in ensuring our nation’s security.”

The case comes at a particularly strained time for Sino-US relations, especially after the recent House of Representative Intelligence Committee branded tech giants Huawei and ZTE a national security risk to American companies and government agencies.

The strict US export restrictions – which apply to several countries – cover any technology considered to have military uses. They have already snared ZTE, which is being investigated for exporting US-made tech to Iran.

In September, the federal trial began of a Chinese man accused of smuggling hi-tech secrets from the US to his homeland in the hope of landing a better job. Sixing Liu still awaits his verdict. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
'Blow it up': Plods pop round for chat with Commonwealth Games tweeter
You'd better not be talking about the council's housing plans
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.