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Volunteers sought to see if anyone actually can hear you scream in space

Violent alien baby in your stomach not compulsory

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Those of you who've ever wondered if the Alien assertion that "in space, nobody can hear you scream" has any scientific basis can now put it to the test, thanks to Cambridge University Spaceflight (CUSF).

In December, CUSF will be blasting a Google Android phone into orbit as part of the STRaND-1 nanosatellite payload. The plan is to "test the capabilities of a smartphone to control a satellite in space".

CUSF has previous form for high-altitude smartphone shenanigans - including sending mobes heavenwards as flight computers on stratospheric ballooning missions.

This time around, however, it has developed a mobile app as the basis for an experiment "that will change the scientific world forever".

It has invited people to submit videos of themselves screaming, or indeed indulging in a group scream. Ten winning vids, as selected by public vote, will be loaded onto the smartphone which, once aloft, "will play the screams at full volume, while at the same time recording audio".

The CUSF blurb explains: "The phone will then relay back to Earth pictures of each 'scream' video playing against the spectacular view from the phone's inbuilt camera, along with a sound file that may or may not contain the scream captured in the vacuum of space."

Despite the possibility that the audacious experiment may require scientific textbooks, and indeed thousands of Alien posters, to be torn up and binned, the team members admit they're "not holding their collective breath".

Physics undergraduate Edward Cunningham said: "Obviously, we’re not expecting to get much back, there may be some buzzing, but this is more about getting young people interested in satellites and acoustics, perhaps encouraging them to consider future study in science or engineering."

If you fancy a quick scream, here's an example of what you're up against, with Cambridge Uni's Communications Office in fine voice:

The deadline for submissions is Sunday 4 November. There are full details right here. ®

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