Feeds

Consumer group urges Aussies to spoof IP addresses

Legally dodgy, but great for the hip pocket given down under price premium

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The official organ of the Australian Consumers Association (ACA), the nation's main consumer lobby group, has offered advice on how Australians can avoid geo-blocking regimes.

It's more than a little controversial for the ACA to have done so, through this article in its publication CHOICE, inasmuch as the article itself admits “The legality of circumventing geo-blocking is a grey area” as “Some copyright experts claim those who promote devices or programs that encourage people to infringe copyright are breaking the law.”

It's also a politically bold stance to take, given that the article mentions Hulu as a service Australians can access once their true IP address is masked. Local television stations are now making a big deal about fast-tracking hit shows, to stop local use of VPNs and/or 'Channel BT'. For a consumer group to urge consumers into legally murky positions for the sake of convenience alone is therefore notable.

Australia is also already conducting a parliamentary inquiry into why tech goodies and content cost more in down under than in other nations. CHOICE puts those markups at “50% more for PC games, 34% more for software, 52% more for iTunes music, 41% more for computer hardware and a huge 88% more for Wii games.”

The practice continues: we recently noted that Microsoft's Surface costs more here at Vulture South than it does in the USA. Microsoft told us that's because of local regulations and taxes, but declined to say just which regulations or taxes are the cause of the AUD$25+ price discrepancies for the new typoslab.

Of course this week's week's Kindle-erasure shenanigans may also give Australians pause before they follow the article's advice.

And lurking beneath this debate are the ongoing deliberations on the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, a treaty that Big Content is working hard to shape in ways that could well make IP spoofing and other such manoeuvres rather harder to do with any legitimacy. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
4chan outraged by Emma Watson nudie photo leak SCAM
In the immortal words of Shaggy, it wasn't me us ... amirite?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.