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Big labels try for ISP blocking on 3 more 'pirate' sites

BPI wants Fenopy, Kickass and H33T on blocked pirate list

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Blighty's internet providers have been asked to voluntarily block another three sites accused of piracy by the British Phonographic Industry (BPI).

The BPI, which represents major UK record companies, has asked the ISPs to stop people accessing Fenopy, Kickass Torrents and H33T.

“Like The Pirate Bay, these websites are profiting illegally from distributing music that isn’t theirs, without permission and without paying a penny to the musicians, writers and producers who created it," a BPI spokesperson said in an emailed statement. "It is plain wrong."

"The existence of these sites damages the growth of Britain’s burgeoning digital music sector. We have therefore asked Britain’s six biggest ISPs to block access to the sites," they added.

To get the ISPs to block The Pirate Bay required a court order, and it looks as though this request is going to need the long arm of the law as well.

O2, BT, TalkTalk and Virgin Media all told The Reg that they would want to see a court order before restricting access to any sites.

"We have received correspondence from the BPI and are currently considering our position," an O2 spokesperson said. "We do not currently block access to any website without a Court Order requiring us to do so."

A letter asking for the ban went to O2, Virgin Media, Sky, BT, TalkTalk and EE.

The BPI managed to get a block on The Pirate Bay in April, after it got a high court judge to the order the ISPs to stop access to the site, one of the most popular file-sharing sites on the internet. That said, only a relatively minor level of tech savvy is required for a blocked user to gain access to The Pirate Bay despite the ISP-level block.

The group is clearly hoping that having got one court order it's not going to have to go to the bother of getting more when it asks for these restrictions. Even if it does have to go to court, the order could come more quickly than The Pirate Bay one because of the precedents set in that case. ®

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