Feeds

Four in ten Brits have had to change all their passwords to foil crooks

Also, teens warned that saucy pics may be re-used as porn

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

A survey of over 3,000 Brits has discovered that more than half (56 per cent) have been targeted by online criminals with a successful attack costing, on average, £247 per person.

The study, released on Monday to coincide with the start of the annual Get Safe Online awareness week, discovered that almost one in five (17 per cent) victims were too embarrassed to tell anyone or share their experience with others. Almost a third of those surveyed by OnePoll (29 per cent) admitted they didn't know whether or not they were putting themselves at risk when they used the net.

GetSafeOnline.org is trying to encourage greater openness and discussion about online security problems via a "Click & Tell" online campaign and roadshow which will visit various UK cities this week (22-26 October). This year marks the seventh edition of GetSafeOnline, a campaign backed by the UK government and numerous internet security firms.

The GetSafeOnline.org survey showed that almost one in five (19 per cent) have lost money as a result of cyber criminals. An even greater number have suffered inconvenience as a result of online security attacks: almost half (40 per cent) of respondents were obliged to change all of their passwords and over one in 10 (15 per cent) had to replace their bank cards.

The survey tabulated the five most common online threats to UK surfers:

  1. Viruses (20 per cent)
  2. Email hackers  (18 per cent)
  3. Social media hackers (12 per cent)
  4. Fraudulent selling (12 per cent) – over one in 10 people have bought something online that never arrived
  5. Online credit card fraud (9 per cent)

The survey revealed that consumers frequently don't change their behaviour even after being affected by a security breach. Of those who experienced an attack, 65 per cent of laptop users and 75 per cent of smartphone users continued to use their kit in the same way.

Francis Maude, the UK Minister responsible for cyber security in the Cabinet Office, said: "The internet provides us with so many opportunities – for education, buying and selling online, communicating with work colleagues, friends and family alike. But unfortunately there are always those who will seek to take advantage of us when we are online going about our everyday business.

"Get Safe Online’s new research shows that people are still at risk. We all need to take steps to spread advice on how to help prevent this sort of thing happening in the first place. By following some very simple steps and precautions available through getsafeonline.org, we can continue to take advantage of all the benefits the Internet has to offer, safely and securely," he added.

Teenagers warned: stuff you upload online may re-appear elsewhere online

Separately, young people have been warned they might lose control over images and videos once they are uploaded online.

A study by the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) found that 88 per cent of self-generated, sexually explicit online images and videos of young people are lifted from their original location and uploaded onto other websites.

IWF analysts encountered more than 12,000 such images and videos spread over 68 websites. In many cases, parasitic pornographic websites are lifting photos and videos uploaded by teenagers onto social-networking sites. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
One HUNDRED FAMOUS LADIES exposed NUDE online
Celebrity women victimised as Apple iCloud accounts reportedly popped
Rubbish WPS config sees WiFi router keys popped in seconds
Another day, another way in to your home router
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
New Snowden leak: How NSA shared 850-billion-plus metadata records
'Federated search' spaffed info all over Five Eyes chums
Three quarters of South Korea popped in online gaming raids
Records used to plunder game items, sold off to low lifes
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.