Feeds

Boffinry group shakes tin for effort to build Babbage's Analytical Engine

Doesn't rule out Kickstarter at some point in future

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The group behind the attempt to build Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine has started accepting donated funding for the first stage of the project, a 3D computer simulation.

Plan 28 want to start the ancient computer build with a 3D working simulation, computer historian John Graham-Cumming said.

For that, the group, started by Graham-Cumming, will need £250,000, which it's hoping to gather from supporters on JustGiving, a charity donation site.

Plan 28 will study all Babbage documentation, which has been digitised by the Science Museum, to build the simulation.

"When done that'll be the first time anyone has seen the AE in action, albeit a computer, physical simulation," Graham-Cumming said on Hacker News.

The BBC had reported that the group was against using Kickstarter to fund the project, but Graham-Cumming corrected Auntie, saying Plan 28 might go back to the crowdfunding website once it was ready to start on the actual Engine.

"Implicit in the Kickstarter process is that the amount of money asked for is enough to make the project happen. In the case of Plan 28 that's likely £5m over ten years. But also Kickstarter is 'all or nothing' so we could have found ourselves falling short of the money we need and receiving nothing," he wrote on his blog.

"All these things lead us to conclude that working with JustGiving made more sense. We may return to Kickstarter when we start to build the actual machine and the end is in sight, but for the moment we are going the traditional fund-raising route."

He also mentioned that Kickstarter fees were quite high and Plan 28, as a charity, would be able to claim back tax on donations and that would be very hard to run through the crowdfunding site.

The Analytical Engine was designed by Charles Babbage in the 1800s and Ada Lovelace allegedly wrote mathematic programmes for it. The steam-powered, brass and iron computer was never built. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Antarctic ice THICKER than first feared – penguin-bot boffins
Robo-sub scans freezing waters, rocks warming models
Your PHONE is slowly KILLING YOU
Doctors find new Digitillnesses - 'text neck' and 'telepressure'
SEX BEAST SEALS may be egging each other on to ATTACK PENGUINS
Boffin: 'I think the behaviour is increasing in frequency'
Reuse the Force, Luke: SpaceX's Elon Musk reveals X-WING designs
And a floating carrier for recyclable rockets
The next big thing in medical science: POO TRANSPLANTS
Your brother's gonna die, kid, unless we can give him your, well ...
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Britain's HUMAN DNA-strewing Moon mission rakes in £200k
3 days, and Kickstarter moves lander 37% nearer takeoff
prev story

Whitepapers

Seattle children’s accelerates Citrix login times by 500% with cross-tier insight
Seattle Children’s is a leading research hospital with a large and growing Citrix XenDesktop deployment. See how they used ExtraHop to accelerate launch times.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.