Feeds

Boffinry group shakes tin for effort to build Babbage's Analytical Engine

Doesn't rule out Kickstarter at some point in future

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

The group behind the attempt to build Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine has started accepting donated funding for the first stage of the project, a 3D computer simulation.

Plan 28 want to start the ancient computer build with a 3D working simulation, computer historian John Graham-Cumming said.

For that, the group, started by Graham-Cumming, will need £250,000, which it's hoping to gather from supporters on JustGiving, a charity donation site.

Plan 28 will study all Babbage documentation, which has been digitised by the Science Museum, to build the simulation.

"When done that'll be the first time anyone has seen the AE in action, albeit a computer, physical simulation," Graham-Cumming said on Hacker News.

The BBC had reported that the group was against using Kickstarter to fund the project, but Graham-Cumming corrected Auntie, saying Plan 28 might go back to the crowdfunding website once it was ready to start on the actual Engine.

"Implicit in the Kickstarter process is that the amount of money asked for is enough to make the project happen. In the case of Plan 28 that's likely £5m over ten years. But also Kickstarter is 'all or nothing' so we could have found ourselves falling short of the money we need and receiving nothing," he wrote on his blog.

"All these things lead us to conclude that working with JustGiving made more sense. We may return to Kickstarter when we start to build the actual machine and the end is in sight, but for the moment we are going the traditional fund-raising route."

He also mentioned that Kickstarter fees were quite high and Plan 28, as a charity, would be able to claim back tax on donations and that would be very hard to run through the crowdfunding site.

The Analytical Engine was designed by Charles Babbage in the 1800s and Ada Lovelace allegedly wrote mathematic programmes for it. The steam-powered, brass and iron computer was never built. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Our LOHAN spaceplane ballocket Kickstarter climbs through £8000
Through 25 per cent but more is needed: Get your UNIQUE rewards!
LOHAN tunes into ultra long range radio
And verily, Vultures shall speak status unto distant receivers
NASA to reformat Opportunity rover's memory from 125 million miles away
Interplanetary admins will back up data and get to work
SpaceX prototype rocket EXPLODES over Texas. 'Tricky' biz, says Elon Musk
No injuries or near injuries. Flight stayed in designated area
EOS, Lockheed to track space junk from Oz
WA facility gets laser-eyes out of the fog
Volcanic eruption in Iceland triggers CODE RED aviation warning
Lava-spitting Bárðarbunga prompts action from Met Office
LOHAN Kickstarter push breaks TWELVE THOUSAND POUNDS
That's right, folks, you've stumped up OVER 9,000 beer tokens - and counting
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.