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IBM claims first with Hadoop data security suite

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IBM is launching what it claims is the first data security system for Hadoop, as part of its biggest product rollout of security software and services yet seen from the company.

Big Blue's not the highest profile security firm, but it has been buying in a lot of talent over the last three years and last year grouped staff and resources around a dedicated security unit. That team has now released a raft of new and updated products as part of a drive to make the company something for everything, from the datacenter to the mobile.

The Hadoop system, dubbed InfoSphere Guardium v9 for Hadoop, stems from technology bought out by Big Blue in 2009 from Guardium, and covers real time security and vulnerability monitoring. The software works with both structured and unstructured databases and includes an automatic compliance and data privacy reporting system.

Also for Hadoop systems, IBM has upgraded its Optim Data Masking system for Big Data users, which obfuscates sensitive data, limiting direct access, and also supports application-specific masking from Oracle and SAP. For those that want to encrypt their data there's also an upgrade to Tivoli Key Lifecycle Manager.

On the mainframe front IBM's extending the QRadar platform it debuted in February onto its zSecure reporting and audit system, but the company has put a lot more effort into cloud offerings. QRadar will be built into IBM's zSecure cloud service, there's also a new automated patching system and a couple of new identity and access management services for both cloud and mobile.

Paula Musich, principle analyst in enterprise security at Current Analysis, told The Register IBM's looking to become a one-stop shop for security tools and service, capitalizing on IT managers' desire to simplify their security around a few key providers.

"The larger vendors don’t move that quickly, and we're still at the top of the hype cycle for Big Data," she said. "I sense IBM might surprise you a lot more often in that regard. It's moved really quickly in the year since forming the security division and there's a sense of urgency that didn’t exist before. Bringing everything under one unit has really brought some focus." ®

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