Feeds

O2 kicks out Ericsson server for breaking its network

No third strike for dodgy database

The essential guide to IT transformation

Ericsson's Centralized User Database has been fingered by O2 for a second network outage which hit the operator last week, and will thus be given the boot despite the £10m cost of a replacement.

Last week's outage wasn't as serious as the 21-hour downtime which hit O2 customers in July, but it was down to the same bit of kit – which is why O2 is replacing it with "a proven alternative solution" and has earmarked £10m to pay for the switch on top of the £1.5m that it spends daily on expanding the network.

"We are not prepared to risk this happening to our customers for a third time," says the canned statement from COO Derek McManus, who also talks about "re-focusing our Service Experience Team to be solely dedicated to ensuring the highest level of customer network experience". He adds: "Their performance will now be measured on customers’ confidence in our network."

Confidence is key here. Customers will pay more for reliable connectivity and will avoid any company they don't believe capable of delivering it. One outage may be considered unfortunate, it could happen to anyone, but two looks like a trend and something must be seen to be done.

But the move is bad news for Ericsson. O2 is still working with the telecommunications technology provider, of course – the whole radio network has been outsourced to Ericsson since 2009. The problem at hand is just this shiny new server, so Ericsson will be top of the vendor list to provide a replacement, but it won't be the only name there.

Huawei already has the O2 contract for next-generation kit, so will no doubt be putting its access to O2's Slough headquarters to good use in an attempt to get some kit in place, and one can be sure that the rest of the pack will be lurking nearby.

O2 tells us it is "working through the detail" on the replacement, and all likelihood it will be an existing Ericsson server, just one with less ambition than the CUDB.

It's hard to see how that will restore confidence of ordinary customers, but this is also about restoring the confidence of the industry, and investors, who may care more, and it will likely make O2 a little less gung ho about new servers in future too, for better or for worse. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
EE plonks 4G in UK Prime Minister's backyard
OK, his constituency. Brace yourself for EXTRA #selfies
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.