Feeds

Map law could see China confiscate mobes at Customs

If your maps app gives disputed islands the wrong name, prepare to surrender!

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Travellers to China would be well-advised to check their mobile mapping clients before embarking, after it emerged that customs officers have been given the power to confiscate any device featuring illegal maps, such as those mislabelling important islands.

The new policy would see any mobiles or tablets seized at the border transferred to the National Administration of Surveying, Mapping and Geoinformation (NASMG) for further investigation, according to Xinhua.

An ‘illegal’ map could apparently be one that ascribes Middle Kingdom territories to other nations, features mistakes in the location of the Chinese border or leaks confidential information about sensitive military and other locations.

Taiwanese officials recently complained to Apple after its maps app identified, with gloriously high-resolution imagery, a new state-of-the-art early-warning radar installation located near Hsinchu airbase.

China has always had particularly strict rules governing the mapping of its territory, restricting licenses to only a handful of firms.

It recently announced plans to increase fines for those failing to include territorial outposts and a requirement that all web-based map providers locate their services within China.

These latest moves can probably be viewed as a response to the simmering maritime territorial disputes with other Asian nations which flared in recent months with violent nationwide protests after Japan decided to buy the contested Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands.

It’s not entirely clear whether Google or Apple’s map clients would land an unsuspecting traveller to China in trouble under the new regulations.

A cursory search on Google Maps shows the islands labelled by their Chinese, Japanese and Taiwanese names, while Apple Maps has apparently duplicated them, to give one set each to China and Japan. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.