Feeds

Calxeda plots server dominance with ARM SoCs

Prepping a MEEELLION-NODE fleet services enema for data centers

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Brawnier clusters on the way

Calxeda's EnergyCore roadmap plots course to brawnier clusters

Calxeda's EnergyCore roadmap plots course to brawnier clusters

About a year later comes the "Lago" SoC from Calxeda, and in case you are wondering, Calxeda is picking its code names from a map of Texas and using towns that have 1,000 people or less in their population.

With Lago, Calxeda will move to the ARMv8 core, which has 64-bit processing and memory addressing and next-generation hardware virtualization circuits, among many other features. With this third generation SoC, Calxeda will add more cores, move to the 64-bit Neon floating point unit, offer faster single-thread performance, and add a significantly upgraded L2 switch interconnect that will be able to scale up to 100,000 nodes in a single cluster without having to add any external switches.

The company is not providing any more specs on this interconnect, but says it will have much higher bandwidth (obviously) and much lower latency.

This is a big deal, and it explains, more than anything else, why Intel has been buying up switching assets for the past year and getting paychecks to significant networking talent. Switching, not just network controller ports, is the next thing that is going to be integrated onto processors.

The Lago chip will sport about twice the performance (presumably compared to the Midway chip, and presumably on integer work) and boosted floating point performance (by how much, Calxeda is not saying). Again, no word on what chip process or what fab will be used for Lago, but it could end up being a 28 nanometer chip from TSMC as well.

EnergyCore clusters get bigger, chips get more powerful over time

EnergyCore clusters get bigger, chips get more powerful over time

But that's not all. Calxeda has two more SoCs in the works as it plots its data center domination. With the future "Ratamosa" chip, Calxeda will be able to take on enterprise applications and high performance computing, and Microsoft might even have a Windows Server variant out by then. The company is not saying anything about timing on the Ratamosa chip, but it stands to reason that it will keep to a year cadence and we should see it around the end of 2015.

And even further out, the fifth generation "Navarro" chip is in development, timed for the "enterprise server era," according to Calxeda, which is coded talk for when the Linux and possibly Windows operating systems and various hypervisors are fully mature on ARM processors. Although Calxeda did not confirm this, this would be the logical place to get a distributed L2 switch interconnect into the field that could handle the 1 million nodes that some customers are asking for.

The ARM server race is afoot. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.