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Amazon reportedly looking to buy TI chip-maker at heart of Kindle Fire

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Mega-etailer Amazon is reportedly in talks to buy a mobile chip business from Texas Instruments.

TI's mobile chips, which are used in Amazon's Kindle Fire fondleslab, could be in the market as the company moves away from smartphones and other mobile devices and into industrial clients like carmakers.

If the talks lead to a deal, Amazon could pay billions of dollars for the division, Israeli financial newspaper Calcalist said.

TI said last month that it wanted to get out of the mobile memory-making business and into something a bit more profitable. The company told investors that it would still support customers, but it wasn't going to be investing the same amount in the business in future, according to a Reuters report.

Neither Amazon nor Texas Instruments had returned a request for comment at the time of publication. Calcalist said a TI spokeswoman told it that the company would not comment on rumours. ®

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