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Huawei says US probe had 'predetermined outcome'

Argues Congress found no “clear information or evidence” of security risk

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Huawei has hit back at the US Congress'House intelligence Committee report labelling it a business US companies should avoid if they value their privacy and security.

In a canned statement, the company says “... despite our best effort, the Committee appears to have been committed to a predetermined outcome.”

The company says those best efforts involved a significant kimono-opening effort that saw:

“ … our top management team carried out multiple rounds of face-to-face communication with the Committee members in Washington D.C., Hong Kong, and Shenzhen; we opened our R&D area, training center, and manufacturing center to the Committee and offered a wealth of documentation, including the list of members of the Board of Directors and the Supervisory Board over the past 10 years, and the annual sales data since our establishment in 1987; we also made the list of our shareholding employees, the shares they hold, as well as information about our funding resources and financial operations available to the Committee.”

That effort seems to have been fruitless, as the statement says “Unfortunately, the Committee’s report not only ignored our proven track record of network security in the United States and globally, but also paid no attention to the large amount of facts that we have provided.”

Huawei also argues the Congressional committee included “many rumors and speculations“ and concludes that “We have to suspect that the only purpose of such a report is to impede competition and obstruct Chinese ICT companies from entering the US market.”

The statement says Huawei nonetheless “remains committed to being a long-term investor in the U.S. Market”.

In its sign off, Huawei tries to picture itself as an enterprise as American as a Silicon-Valley-baked Apple pie, stating:

“Huawei is no different from any start-up enterprises in Silicon Valley, and our growth and development relies very much on our entrepreneurial spirit, the commitment and hard work of our employees, as well as our unwavering dedication to innovation.

“ Moving forward,” the statement concludes, “we will continue to do the best we can to provide our customers with safe, convenient, and equal access to information and communications services.” ®

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