Feeds

Google settles epic US book-scanning battle with 5 publishers

Digitised deal agreed with big name book-pushers

The Power of One Infographic

Google has settled a seven-year-long dispute with publishers in the United States, bringing to an end a copyright infringement lawsuit first filed against the company in October 2005.

Under the deal, the rights of the copyright-holders have been acknowledged by the search and ad giant.

Five members of the Association of American Publishers (AAP) involved in the litigation and other US publishers will now be able to either yank works belonging to them that have been digitised by Google or else agree to allow those books and journals to be made available via the firm's Library Project.

Mountain View explained: "Those deciding not to remove their works will have the option to receive a digital copy for their use."

It added that Stateside, publishers could additionally ink individual deals with Google for use of their other digitally scanned works.

AAP's boss Tom Allen said he was satisfied by the outcome and added some puffery to the proceedings: "It shows that digital services can provide innovative means to discover content while still respecting the rights of copyright-holders."

Financial terms of the agreements with Penguin Group USA, McGraw-Hill, Pearson Education, Simon & Schuster and John Wiley & Sons were kept secret.

The company added that the "settlement does not affect Google’s current litigation with the Authors Guild or otherwise address the underlying questions in that suit."

The Authors Guild began suing Google in September 2005 over its plans to make scans of millions of books available online. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.