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Pirate Bay site sinks, Swedish police raid its ISP

Oddly, the two events aren't related

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Rumors are flying after the Pirate Bay's website took a dive on Monday just as news broke of a raid by Swedish police on its hosting company PRQ – but the group says the two facts are not related.

"Dear internet. We have not been raided. We are not shutting down. We like turtles, waffles and you," the group said on its Facebook page. "Sorry for not fulfilling your pirate needs tonight. It's ok if you cheat on us with another site, just once. We know that you still love us, deep down in your cursed pirate heart."

The site's problems appear to stem from a power outage on its servers rather than the boys in blue making their call. So far, the site has been down for around nine hours, and internet users looking to get their dose of purloined files will have to go to other providers.

While it is true that the Pirate Bay's Swedish hosting company did receive a visit from local police, this does not appear to be the cause of the outage. In an interview with Nyheter24, the current owner of hosting firm PRQ Mikael Viborg said that the police had taken four servers, but at this point it isn't clear what they contained.

"PRQ is known to host the things that no one else wants to host, and not ask any questions. It can be any of those that are targeted. Until we get more details about the servers, I will not speculate on it," Viborg said.

In comparison with some of PRQ's customer base, the Pirate Bay is about as offensive as puppies frolicking in beige flowers. The ISP, which is run by two of the Pirate Bay's founders Gottfrid Svartholm and Fredrik Neij, believes in hosting all content, no matter what its interests, and as such carries content for groups such as South Park's favorite pederasts, the North American Man/Boy Love Association (NAMBLA).

Cofounder Svartholm himself won't know too much about this, of course. After a lengthy period of being incommunicado, Svartholm was tracked down in Cambodia, where he was arrested by the local police and deported to Sweden, where has will be facing charges related to the hacking of IT consultancy business Logica. ®

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