Feeds

Mmmm, delicious new sugar batteries keep gadgets up all night

We.. like... full-fat batts and we cannot lie

High performance access to file storage

Boffins have discovered they can improve battery capacity by using sucrose - aka table sugar - to create the anode material.

Shinichi Komaba and his team at Tokyo University of Science made the discovery during their efforts to produce commercially viable sodium-ion batteries, according to Japanese tech site DigInfo.tv. The eggheads hope to create high-performance alternatives to lithium-ion storage cells.

By pyrolising sucrose – heating it at 1,000 to 1,500 degrees Celsius in the absence of oxygen, for example in a stream of argon or nitrogen – they were able to create a new type of black hard carbon powder.

This material functions effectively as a battery anode, which is the negative (-) terminal of the device. The zapped sucrose increases storage capacity by 20 per cent to 300 mAh over conventional hard carbon, the report continued.

The scientists spent seven years researching sodium-ion batteries in an attempt to find an alternative to the more common lithium ion variety, which is particularly expensive in Japan because the country needs to import its entire supply of lithium.

"In fact, the supply of sodium is unlimited. Also, sodium-ion batteries can be made using iron, aluminium, and sodium, rather than cobalt or copper as before. What's more, our results show that battery capacity can be increased simply by using carbon made from sugar as the anode,” Komaba told the site.

“So high-performance batteries like expensive lithium batteries, which are an important type of rechargeable battery, may be achievable using cheaper, more abundant materials. We believe that, if the technology and performance can be improved, development may progress toward practical batteries that can replace lithium ion batteries."

Sodium ion batteries may now be a commercial reality within the next five years, according to Komaba.

Sodium-based batteries have already been suggested by researchers at Perth’s Murdoch University as a less toxic alternative to lead-acid batteries in solar power installations. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Fancy joining Reg hack on quid-a-day challenge?
Recruiting now for charity starvation diet
Red-faced LOHAN team 'fesses up in blown SPEARS fuse fiasco
Standing in the corner, big pointy 'D' hats
KILLER SPONGES menacing California coastline
Surfers are safe, crustaceans less so
Opportunity selfie: Martian winds have given the spunky ol' rover a spring cleaning
Power levels up 70 per cent as the rover keeps on truckin'
Discovery time for 200m WONDER MATERIALS shaved from 4 MILLENNIA... to 4 years
Alloy, Alloy: Boffins in speed-classification breakthrough
Elon Musk's LEAKY THRUSTER gas stalls Space Station supply run
Helium seeps from Falcon 9 first stage, delays new legs for NASA robonaut
Top Secret US payload launched into space successfully
Clandestine NRO spacecraft sets off on its unknown mission
New FEMTO-MOON sighted BIRTHING from Saturn's RING
Icy 'Peggy' looks to be leaving the outer rings
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.