Feeds

Mmmm, delicious new sugar batteries keep gadgets up all night

We.. like... full-fat batts and we cannot lie

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Boffins have discovered they can improve battery capacity by using sucrose - aka table sugar - to create the anode material.

Shinichi Komaba and his team at Tokyo University of Science made the discovery during their efforts to produce commercially viable sodium-ion batteries, according to Japanese tech site DigInfo.tv. The eggheads hope to create high-performance alternatives to lithium-ion storage cells.

By pyrolising sucrose – heating it at 1,000 to 1,500 degrees Celsius in the absence of oxygen, for example in a stream of argon or nitrogen – they were able to create a new type of black hard carbon powder.

This material functions effectively as a battery anode, which is the negative (-) terminal of the device. The zapped sucrose increases storage capacity by 20 per cent to 300 mAh over conventional hard carbon, the report continued.

The scientists spent seven years researching sodium-ion batteries in an attempt to find an alternative to the more common lithium ion variety, which is particularly expensive in Japan because the country needs to import its entire supply of lithium.

"In fact, the supply of sodium is unlimited. Also, sodium-ion batteries can be made using iron, aluminium, and sodium, rather than cobalt or copper as before. What's more, our results show that battery capacity can be increased simply by using carbon made from sugar as the anode,” Komaba told the site.

“So high-performance batteries like expensive lithium batteries, which are an important type of rechargeable battery, may be achievable using cheaper, more abundant materials. We believe that, if the technology and performance can be improved, development may progress toward practical batteries that can replace lithium ion batteries."

Sodium ion batteries may now be a commercial reality within the next five years, according to Komaba.

Sodium-based batteries have already been suggested by researchers at Perth’s Murdoch University as a less toxic alternative to lead-acid batteries in solar power installations. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Gigantic toothless 'DRAGONS' dominated Earth's early skies
Gummy pterosaurs outlived toothy competitors
Vulture 2 takes a battering in 100km/h test run
Still in one piece, but we're going to need MORE POWER
TRIANGULAR orbits will help Rosetta to get up close with Comet 67P
Probe will be just 10km from Space Duck in October
Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away
Bizarre-looking creature actually related to velvet worms
CRR-CRRRK, beep, beep: Mars space truck backs out of slippery sand trap
Curiosity finds new drilling target after course correction
'Leccy racer whacks petrols in Oz race
ELMOFO rakes in two wins in sanctioned race
What does a flashmob of 1,024 robots look like? Just like this
Sorry, Harvard, did you say kilobots or KILLER BOTS?
NASA's rock'n'roll shock: ROLLING STONE FOUND ON MARS
No sign of Ziggy Stardust and his band
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.