Feeds

Verizon CFO: 'Unlimited' data is just a word

Customers might reply that so is 'cancellation'

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Verizon Chief Financial Officer Fran Shammo has told analysts that "unlimited" when used to describe data is "just a word" and the idea of an open pipe is heading to extinction.

"What customers are understanding and through our good sales routine is once you explain to a customer their usage on a monthly basis, unlimited is just a word, it doesn't really mean anything and that people don't really - I think a lot of consumers think they consume a lot more data than they really do.

"So that whole unlimited thing I think is going by the wayside and they see the benefit of going to the shared," he said at the Goldman Sachs Communacopia Conference on Thursday, 20 September.

According to Shammo, many customers are jettisoning unlimited plans in favor of shared data service for multiple devices. Demand for the shared plan was much stronger than the company had expected. And, once on the limited data plans, they are attaching a lot of devices to use the service, he said.

Shammo's comments could be construed as disingenuous. El Reg popped down to our local Verizon store in San Francisco and was told that customers who upgraded to the iPhone 5, or any new handset, automatically lost any existing unlimited data plan. That doesn't sound like much of a "choice".

Shared plans

Shifting users onto the shared plan is critical for Verizon, Shammo told the Goldman Sachs conference, because "the more data they consume the more they will have to buy up in bundles."

The more devices users could be encouraged to connect under the plan then "I get incremental dollars for each device that's attached and that is really what drives the future revenue growth."

Verizon is already planning a mobile video service later in the year, according to recent reports, and this will further increase data usage. If Verizon can dump unlimited data customers then the profits from such a service will only rise.

Verizon and AT&T, the two largest US mobile network operators, still offer unlimited data for a few customers, albeit heavily throttled if certain data limits are reached.

By contrast, Sprint still offers an unlimited option and T-Mobile recently announced it will be selling a true unlimited data service.

Verizon has been busy over the last few years buying up spectrum allocations in the US, notably the $3.6bn acquisition of SpectrumCo's allocation, and Shammo reported that the company now has enough spectrum for at least the next four years.

The company is looking out for more when the government finally gets approval from Congress to set up auctions, he confirmed. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.