Feeds

Roxon clarifies data retention proposals with ASIO support

For you own good, really

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

Australia’s Attorney-General, Nicola Roxon, has tried to take some of the heat out of the data retention debate.

In a letter to the Joint Parliamentary Committee on Intelligence and Security, which is investigating data retention as part of its examination of national security legislation, Ms Roxon has written: “The government does not propose that a data retention scheme would apply to the content of communications,” adding that the government does not intend to allow warrantless access to “the content of communications”.

The letter comes after repeated criticism from ALP senator John Faulkner regarding the vague wording of the data retention proposals in the discussion paper before the committee.

Ms Roxon’s letter makes extensive reference to the European Directive on data retention – however, it does not explicitly state that the government wishes to implement Europe’s model.

Meanwhile, the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) has weighed in with an unclassified submission to the committee. Singing from the same sheet as its minister, the intelligence agency also points at the European Directive as “an important basis for discussion with Australian C/CSPs [carriers and carriage service providers – The Register], agencies and other stakeholders”.

If the EU directive were to become the model Australia imitates, it would return the data retention debate to where it stood in 2011, when new cybercrime legislation was first proposed.

Both Ms Roxon and ASIO are now at pains to state that they only seek retention of information about communications, not the content of those communications. This, presumably, could be met be the retention of server logs if the carrier, CSP or ISP hosts the service of interest. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.